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Pammel, Louis Herman

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Dates:           b. 1862; to Iowa 1889; d. 1931

Locations:    Prof. and Head, Dept. of Botany, Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (1889‑)

Training:      BSA Wisconsin 1885 under Trelease; MS Wisc. 1889; PhD in Botany Wash. Univ. under Trelease 1897

Fields:        biology; agricultural; veterinary; domestic; plant pathology; water

Publications: report on bacteria in butter, Bull. Iowa Exp. Sta. no. 21 (1900?): 801; Pammel and Lummis, "The Germination of Weed Seeds," 24th Ann. Meeting for the Soc. Prom. Agr. Sci. (1903): 82‑92; A Manual of Poisonous Plants (1910); Weeds of the Farm and Garden (1911); The Weed Flora of Iowa (1913, 1926)

SAB Involvement:  Charter SAB member;

Archive Files: D.H. Bergey, "Early Instructors in Bacteriology in the United States," J. of Bact. 2 (1917): 595‑601; Pammel, "Prominent Men I have Met," around 1926 or so; R. Allen Packer, "Early History of the Teaching of Veterinary Bacteriology at Iowa State University," (1983); archives held at Iowa State

 

Notes: 

     Pammel was a student of Trelease, and in 1886 he began to include bacteriology as part of a course in cryptogamic botany for veterinary students.  In the spring of 1889, Pammel established a general bacteriology course for senior veterinary students and students in home economics.  It was a required course for vet. students, and Pammel continued to teach the course until 1905.

     Pammel also worked on black rot of cabbage in 1895.  His own research interests lay in medicinal and poisonous plants. 

     At the 1900 meeting of the SAB, Pammel submitted a paper on "Bacteria in the Ames Sewage Disposal Plant," but there was no evidence that he delivered the paper, or was in attendance.  He submitted again at the 1901 meeting with the exact same paper, and it was read by title.  At the 1904 SAB meeting, he discussed "The Bacteriology of Some Railroad Water Supplies," and it appears that he was in attendance, as the paper was discussed by Rettger and Harding.

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