Issue #669

 

  1. Nanoparticles Laced With Bee Venom Selectively Destroy HIV Virus
  2. 'Nightmare' Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Hospitals
  3. 'Bizarre Bacteria' in Lake Vostok Study Likely a Contaminant
  4. Scientists find how deadly new virus infects human cells
  5. Research Explores Relationship of the Human Microbiome and Obesity
  6. Craig Venter close to creating synthetic life
  7. Hawaii House considers adopting state microbe; state would be first in nation
  8. Biological wires carry electricity thanks to special amino acids


Nanoparticles Laced With Bee Venom Selectively Destroy HIV Virus
Redorbit
March 8, 2013
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1112799525/naonparticles-bee-venom-kill-hiv-030813/
According to a new report in the journal Antiviral Therapy, researchers have found that nanoparticles loaded with bee venom are capable of destroying the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while leaving the body’s cells unharmed.


'Nightmare' Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Hospitals
WebMD
March 5, 2013
http://www.webmd.com/news/20130305/nightmare-bacteria-spreading-in-us-hospitals-nursing-homes-cdc
A "nightmare" bacteria that is resistant to powerful antibiotics and kills half of those it infects has surfaced in nearly 200 U.S. hospitals and nursing homes, federal health officials reported last week.


Russian scientist defends Lake Vostok life claims
Nature
March 12, 2013
http://www.nature.com/news/russian-scientist-defends-lake-vostok-life-claims-1.12578
The Russian scientist who is leading an effort to analyse samples from a lake buried under almost 4 kilometres of Antarctic ice has hit back against criticism that an unknown species of bacterium discovered by the team was in fact contamination.


Scientists find how deadly new virus infects human cells
Reuters
March 13, 2013
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/13/us-virus-mechanism-idUSBRE92C10620130313
Scientists have worked out how a deadly new virus which was unknown in humans until last year is able to infect human cells and cause severe, potentially fatal damage to the lungs.


Research Explores Relationship of the Human Microbiome and Obesity
General Surgery News
March 2013
http://www.generalsurgerynews.com/ViewArticle.aspx?d=In+the+News&d_id=69&i=March+2013&i_id=940&a_id=22692
Long understudied, the human microbiome—the microbes, with their genomes, that dwell in and on the human body—is now under intense scrutiny. It is increasingly clear that “the human indigenous microbial communities … play a larger role in human health and disease than previously recognized”.


Craig Venter close to creating synthetic life
New Scientist
March 13, 2013
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23266-craig-venter-close-to-creating-synthetic-life.html?cmpid=RSS|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|online-news
For the first time we are close to creating artificial life from scratch. So says Craig Venter, founder of the J. Craig Venter Institute in Rockville, Maryland, and famed for creating the first cell with a synthetic genome.


Hawaii House considers adopting state microbe; state would be first in nation
Maui News
February 23, 2013
http://www.mauinews.com/page/content.detail/id/570140/Hawaii-House-considers-adopting-state-microbe--state-would-be-first-in-nation.html?nav=5031
Hawaii could be the first state in the nation to adopt an official microbe, University of Hawaii professor Stuart Donachie said.


Biological wires carry electricity thanks to special amino acids
R&D Magazine
March 12, 2013
http://www.rdmag.com/news/2013/03/biological-wires-carry-electricity-thanks-special-amino-acids
Slender bacterial nanowires require certain key amino acids in order to conduct electricity, according to a study to be published in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Issue #670

  1. Phages may be key in bacteria battle
  2. Scientists Find Bacteria Where It Isn’t Supposed to Be: The Brain
  3. Probiotics may alter brain activity in healthy people, says Danone/UCLA data
  4. Gutnik? NASA to launch colon-inhabiting bacteria into space
  5. This Protein Could Change Biotech Forever
  6. Highly effective communities of bacteria in the world's deepest oceanic trench
  7. Engineered Bacteria Measure Caffeine Concentrations
  8. Pain reliever Naproxen may help combat flu


Phages may be key in bacteria battle
BBC
March 15, 2013
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21799534
They might look like sinister aliens, but these bacteria-munching viruses could be the next weapon in the fight against infectious diseases.


Scientists Find Bacteria Where It Isn’t Supposed to Be: The Brain
The Daily Beast
March 17, 2013
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/03/17/scientists-find-bacteria-where-it-isn-t-supposed-to-be-the-brain.html
The brain was long thought to be a kind of fortress, separated from the body by a virtually impenetrable barrier of specialized cells. Now, that view is beginning to shift, with increasing evidence that aliens can, and do, sneak in.


Probiotics may alter brain activity in healthy people, says Danone/UCLA data
Nutraingredients
March 14, 2013
http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Research/A-big-step-forward-Probiotics-may-alter-brain-activity-in-healthy-people-says-Danone-UCLA-data
Daily supplements of a fermented milk product containing five different probiotic strains may affect the parts of the brain linked to emotion and sensation, says a new study from UCLA and Danone.


Gutnik? NASA to launch colon-inhabiting bacteria into space
Scope Blog
March 15, 2013
http://scopeblog.stanford.edu/2013/03/15/gutnik-nasa-to-launch-colon-inhabiting-bacteria-into-space/
A news release issued by NASA’s Ames Research Center foretells the launch into space of a satellite inhabited by a bunch of nano-mariners who, left to their own devices, would no doubt rather curl up inside a bowel.


This Protein Could Change Biotech Forever
Forbes
March 19, 2013
http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewherper/2013/03/19/the-protein-that-could-change-biotech-forever/
A tiny molecular machine used by bacteria to kill attacking viruses could change the way that scientists edit the DNA of plants, animals and fungi, revolutionizing genetic engineering. The protein, called Cas9, is quite simply a way to more accurately cut a piece of DNA.


Highly effective communities of bacteria in the world's deepest oceanic trench
SpaceDaily
March 22, 2013
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Highly_effective_communities_of_bacteria_in_the_worlds_deepest_oceanic_trench_999.html
An international research team announces the first scientific results from one of the most inaccessible places on Earth: the bottom of the Mariana Trench located nearly 11 kilometers below sea level in the western Pacific, which makes it the deepest site on Earth. Their analyses document that a highly active bacteria community exists in the sediment of the trench - even though the environment is under extreme pressure almost 1,100 times higher than at sea level.


Engineered Bacteria Measure Caffeine Concentrations
Chemical and Engineering News
March 21, 2013
http://cen.acs.org/articles/91/web/2013/03/Engineered-Bacteria-Measure-Caffeine-Concentrations.html
One team of researchers has developed a unique way to measure caffeine levels. They’ve engineered Escherichia coli so that the bacteria’s growth depends on the concentration of the invigorating compound.


Pain reliever Naproxen may help combat flu
Zee News
March 22, 2013
http://zeenews.india.com/news/health/health-news/pain-reliever-naproxen-may-help-combat-flu_21116.html
Naproxen, the over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug, may also exhibit antiviral activity against influenza A virus, a team of French scientists has concluded in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

Issue #647

In this week's issue:
  1. Vipers Go Viral
  2. Controversial "Arsenic Life" Bacterium Prefers Phosphorus After All
  3. UK Officials: Fatal Crimean Congo Virus Unlikely To Spread
  4. For immune system, vitamin B’s the tip-off
  5. Working toward a universal vaccine for all influenza A and B viruses
  6. Museum pelts help date the koala retrovirus
  7. Bioengineers Introduce 'Bi-Fi' -- The Biological 'Internet'


Vipers Go Viral
Science
October 5, 2012
http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2012/10/vipers-go-viral.html
A new study suggests that snakes harbor the Eastern equine encephalitis virus through the winter, but experts disagree on whether the finding clinches the question for good.


Controversial "Arsenic Life" Bacterium Prefers Phosphorus After All
Scientific American
October 4, 2012
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=controversial-arsenic-life-bacterium-prefers-phosphorous-after-all
New work explains how a microbe can thrive in the high-arsenic conditions of California's Mono Lake.


UK Officials: Fatal Crimean Congo Virus Unlikely To Spread
Redorbit
October 7, 2012
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1112708118/crimean-congo-virus-uk-100712/
The UK’s first laboratory confirmed case of Crimean Congo Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (CCVHF) has died. Even so, health officials are stressing that this will not become a public outbreak.


For immune system, vitamin B’s the tip-off
Futurity
October 11, 2012
http://www.futurity.org/health-medicine/for-immune-system-vitamin-bs-the-tip-off/
Specialized immune cells recognize the vitamin B synthesized by bacteria and yeast, and this signal sets off their fight against infection, scientists say.


Working toward a universal vaccine for all influenza A and B viruses
Phys.org
October 11, 2012
http://phys.org/news/2012-10-universal-vaccine-influenza-viruses.html
A group of researchers building upon their earlier work with influenza A viruses, has now discovered a similar phenomenon for neutralizing influenza B viruses.


Museum pelts help date the koala retrovirus
Virology.ws
October 11, 2012
http://www.virology.ws/2012/10/11/museum-pelts-help-date-the-koala-retrovirus/
A study of Koala pelts preserved in museums suggests how recently the KoRV virus infected this animal.


Bioengineers Introduce 'Bi-Fi' -- The Biological 'Internet'
ScienceDaily
September 27, 2012
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120928103802.htm
Researchers have parasitized the M13 viral parasite and harnessed M13's key attributes -- its non-lethality and its ability to package and broadcast arbitrary DNA strands -- to create what might be termed the biological Internet, or "Bi-Fi."

 
Information on other research developments can be found at these sites: 

Science News: 
http://www.microbeworld.org/
http://www.scicentral.com/
http://sciencedaily.com

 

Press Releases:

http://www.eurekalert.org/
http://www.newswise.com/

 

Links to other Internet sites are provided as a convenience only. ASM makes no representations about non-ASM sites; providing a link does not mean that ASM endorses or approves the site or accepts any responsibility for its content or use.

Issue #644

In this week's issue:

  1. Multicenter Study Further Debunks Link Between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Murine Viruses
  2. Giant Viruses Rewrite History of Life on Earth
  3. Taking a Shot at Sinking the 'Cruise Ship' Virus
  4. Discovery of essential genes for drug-resistant bacteria reveals new, high-value drug targets
  5. Microbes in gut grab more fat from food
  6. Bacteria May Signal Risk For Pancreatic Cancer
  7. Evolutionary innovation caught in the act
  8. Drug resistant tuberculosis found across the world


Multicenter Study Further Debunks Link Between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Murine Viruses
GenomeWeb
September 20, 2012
http://bit.ly/RGZ38z
A study published this week provides the most definitive evidence to date disproving previous reports that used molecular testing methods such as qPCR to establish a link between chronic fatigue syndrome, or myalgic encephalomyelitis, and various murine leukemia viruses.


Giant Viruses Rewrite History of Life on Earth
Sci-News
September 14, 2012
http://www.sci-news.com/biology/article00588.html
A new study by a multinational team of scientists supports the idea that viruses are ancient living organisms and not inanimate molecular remnants run amok, as some scientists have argued.


Taking a Shot at Sinking the 'Cruise Ship' Virus
WebMD
September 13, 2012
http://www.webmd.com/news/20120913/taking-shot-sinking-cruise-ship-virus
An experimental vaccine shows promise for protecting people against a nasty stomach virus known for causing outbreaks of diarrhea and vomiting on cruise ships, in nursing homes, and in other close quarters.


Discovery of essential genes for drug-resistant bacteria reveals new, high-value drug targets
Phys.org
September 14, 2012
http://bit.ly/R0ClgI
Biomedical scientists collaborating on translational research are reporting the discovery of a novel, and heretofore unrecognized, set of genes essential for the growth of potentially lethal, drug-resistant bacteria.


Microbes in gut grab more fat from food
Futurity
September 12, 2012
http://www.futurity.org/top-stories/microbes-in-gut-grab-more-fat-from-food/
Some gut microbes help the body absorb more dietary fat, which means their host takes in more calories from the same amount of food.


Bacteria May Signal Risk For Pancreatic Cancer
RedOrbit
September 18, 2012
http://bit.ly/VcMm9h
In a new study, researchers report that people who had high levels of antibodies for an infectious oral bacterium turned out to have double the risk for developing pancreatic cancer.


Evolutionary innovation caught in the act
Washington Post
September 19, 2012
http://wapo.st/T60rrZ
Scientists following the evolution of a single strain of bacteria reported that it underwent several steps of mutation, surprising in its complexity, to acquire the ability to use a new food source.


Drug resistant tuberculosis found across the world
Reuters
August 29, 2012
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/29/us-tuberculosis-drug-resistance-idUSBRE87S1F220120829
Scientists have found alarming levels of the lung disease tuberculosis in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America that are resistant to up to four powerful antibiotic drugs.

 
Information on other research developments can be found at these sites: 

Science News: 
http://www.microbeworld.org/
http://www.scicentral.com/
http://sciencedaily.com

 

Press Releases:

http://www.eurekalert.org/
http://www.newswise.com/

 

Links to other Internet sites are provided as a convenience only. ASM makes no representations about non-ASM sites; providing a link does not mean that ASM endorses or approves the site or accepts any responsibility for its content or use.

ASM Weekly Newsdigest #645

 

In this issue:

  1. Hyena Microbiome Differs Between Packs, Helps Smell Friend From Foe
  2. The dual significance of bacterial protein secretion
  3. CDC study suggests many H3N2v cases may be missed
  4. Outbreak of new coronavirus - same family as SARS - has WHO on alert
  5. Are Biologists Watching an Evolutionary Leap: One Life Form Absorbing Another?
  6. Researchers map molecular details that encourage H1N1 transmission to humans
  7. Gut bacteria are different in people with diabetes
  8. Tracking koala disease: New findings from old DNA


Hyena Microbiome Differs Between Packs, Helps Smell Friend From Foe
Geekosystem
August 31, 2012
http://www.geekosystem.com/hyena-microbiome/
New research published this month in the journal Scientific Reports shows that hyenas from different clans appear to have different colonies of bacteria living in their scent glands.


The dual significance of bacterial protein secretion
Phys.org
September 26, 2012
http://phys.org/news/2012-09-dual-significance-bacterial-protein-secretion.html
The coordinated secretion of proteins by bacteria consists of an essential biological process with tremendous impact on human health. European scientists studied a universal and widely conserved bacterial secretory pathway towards its utilisation in biotechnology and medicine.


CDC study suggests many H3N2v cases may be missed
CIDRAP
September 21, 2012
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/swineflu/news/sep2112swine.html
An investigation of one of the first swine-origin H3N2 influenza cases detected in the United States in 2011 suggests that for each confirmed case, there may be many more that go undetected.


Outbreak of new coronavirus - same family as SARS - has WHO on alert
The Canadian Press
September 23, 2012
http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/outbreak-of-new-coronavirus-same-family-as-sars-has-who-on-alert-1.968284
The World Health Organization is keeping a close eye on a disease outbreak in Saudi Arabia caused by a virus in the same family as the one that caused SARS.


Are Biologists Watching an Evolutionary Leap: One Life Form Absorbing Another?
Discover
September 22, 2012
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2012/09/22/are-biologists-watching-an-evolutionary-leap-one-life-form-absorbing-another/
Researchers have found another useful bacterium that they think is on its way to becoming a modern organelle of another eukaryotic cell.


Researchers map molecular details that encourage H1N1 transmission to humans
MedicalXpress
September 20. 2012
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-09-molecular-h1n1-transmission-humans.html
The 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus appears to have required certain mutations in order to be transmitted to humans.


Gut bacteria are different in people with diabetes
LA Times
September 26, 2012
http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-gut-bacteria-diabetes-20120925,0,408189.story?track=rss
A study in Nature that finds differences between the bacteria growing in the guts of people who have diabetes and those who don't.


Tracking koala disease: New findings from old DNA
Phys.org
September 26, 2012
http://phys.org/news/2012-09-tracking-koala-disease-dna.html
DNA extracted from the skins of koalas displayed in European and North American museums shows that a retrovirus has been a problem for the animals for much longer than was thought.

 

 

Information on other research developments can be found at these sites: 
Science News: 
http://www.microbeworld.org/
http://www.scicentral.com/
http://sciencedaily.com

 

Press Releases:

http://www.eurekalert.org/
http://www.newswise.com/

 

Links to other Internet sites are provided as a convenience only. ASM makes no representations about non-ASM sites; providing a link does not mean that ASM endorses or approves the site or accepts any responsibility for its content or use.

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