ASM Weekly Newsdigest #612



  1. Bacteria in the gut of autistic children different from non-autistic children
  2. Bacteria's slimy biofilm could help humans
  3. Skin bacteria affect how attractive we smell to malarial mosquitoes
  4. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria From the Fukushima Nuclear Accident?
  5. Gut microbe networks differ from norm in obese people, systems biology approach reveals
  6. Compound halts foodborne bugs
  7. Bacterial avengers
  8. Scientists: UN Soldiers Brought Deadly Superbug to Americas
  9. Can a vaccine cure Haiti's cholera?
  10. Worm Seeks Worm: Chemical Cues Drive Aggregation in Nematodes
  11. New Laboratory Method Uses Mass Spectrometry to Rapidly Detect Staph Infections



Bacteria in the gut of autistic children different from non-autistic children
ScienceDaily
January 9, 2012
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120109211825.htm
The underlying reason autism is often associated with gastrointestinal problems is an unknown, but new results published in the online journal mBio® on January 10 reveal that the guts of autistic children differ from other children in at least one important way: many children with autism harbor a type of bacteria in their guts that non-autistic children do not.


Bacteria's slimy biofilm could help humans
MSNBC
January 6, 2012
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45907177/ns/technology_and_science-innovation/#.TxBXR6VSS5J
Though many biofilms harm us now, scientists hope that in the future, they can grow genetically engineered bacteria in large, hardy biofilm communities that produce drugs or alternative fuels at an industrial scale. 


Skin bacteria affect how attractive we smell to malarial mosquitoes
Discover
December 28, 2012
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2011/12/28/skin-bacteria-affect-how-attractive-we-smell-to-malarial-mosquitoes/
Niels Verhulst from Wageningen University and Research Centre has just found that the bacteria on our skin can affect our odds of being bitten by a malarial mosquito.


Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria From the Fukushima Nuclear Accident?
Huffington Post
January 9, 2012
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-douglas-fields/antibiotic-resistant-bact_b_1176687.html
Could the radiation that will be contaminating the environment surrounding the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant for hundreds of years produce bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics?


Gut microbe networks differ from norm in obese people, systems biology approach reveals
University of Washington
January 10, 2012
http://www.washington.edu/news/articles/gut-microbe-networks-differ-from-norm-in-obese-people-systems-biology-approach-reveals-2
For the first time, researchers have analyzed the multitude of microorganisms residing in the human gut as a complex, integrated biological system, rather than a set of separate species. Their approach has revealed patterns that correspond with excess body weight.


Compound halts foodborne bugs
Futurity
January 6, 2012
http://www.futurity.org/health-medicine/compound-halts-foodborne-bugs/
Researchers have found a compound that is safe for mammals but stops the foodborne bacteria Listeria in its tracks.


Bacterial avengers
Colombus Dispatch
January 8, 2012
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/science/2012/01/08/bacterial-avengers.html
OSU researcher says bioreactors can clean polluted stormwater before it reaches streams, rivers.


Scientists: UN Soldiers Brought Deadly Superbug to Americas
ABC News
January 12, 2012
http://news.yahoo.com/scientists-un-soldiers-brought-deadly-superbug-americas-194141189--abc-news.html
Compelling new scientific evidence suggests United Nations peacekeepers have carried a virulent strain of cholera -- a super bug -- into the Western Hemisphere for the first time.


Can a vaccine cure Haiti's cholera?
Nature
January 13, 2012
http://www.nature.com/news/can-a-vaccine-cure-haiti-s-cholera-1.9802
The cholera epidemic in Haiti has cast a stark light on deep development holes and disagreements about whether a short-term patch—in the form of a cholera vaccine—can help in the long-term fight for better health.


Worm Seeks Worm: Chemical Cues Drive Aggregation in Nematodes
ScienceDaily
January 12, 2012
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120112100625.htm
Right under our feet, it appears that nematodes -- also known as roundworms -- are having their own little gatherings in the soil. Until recently, it was unknown how the worms communicate to one another when it's time to come together. Now, however, researchers have identified, for the first time, the chemical signals that promote aggregation.


New Laboratory Method Uses Mass Spectrometry to Rapidly Detect Staph Infections
Georgia Tech News
January 12, 2012
http://gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/staph-infection-test/
Researchers have developed a new laboratory test that can rapidly identify the bacterium responsible for staph infections.

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