Congratulations to the following newly elected Fellows!


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Eighty-eight microbiologists have been elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology.  Fellows of the Academy are elected annually through a highly selective, peer-review process, based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology. There are over 2,400 Fellows representing all subspecialties of microbiology, including basic and applied research, teaching, public health, industry, and government service. The new Fellows are as follows:

 

  • Gary R. Acuff, Ph.D., Texas A&M University, College Station
  • Cecilia M. Arraiano, Ph.D., Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Oeiras, Portugal
  • Eurico Arruda, M.D., Ph.D., University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Brazil
  • Irina Artsimovitch, Ph.D., The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Carlos F. Barbas, III, Ph.D., The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA
  • Christopher F. Basler, Ph.D., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
  • Dennis A. Bazylinski, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Bernard Beall, Ph.D., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Deborah Bell-Pedersen, Ph.D., Texas A&M University, College Station
  • Carmen Buchrieser, Ph.D., Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
  • Tom Cavalier-Smith, Ph.D., University of Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Vitaly Citovsky, Ph.D., Stony Brook University, NY
  • Jeffrey I. Cohen, M.D., Laboratory of Infectious Disease, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD
  • Brad T. Cookson, M.D., Ph.D., University of Washington, Seattle
  • Timothy L. Cover, M.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Cameron R. Currie, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Richard Darveau, Ph.D., University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle
  • Martin B. Dickman, Ph.D., Texas A&M University, College Station
  • Andrew D. Ellington, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
  • Suzanne Fleiszig, O.D., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
  • Susan L. Forsburg, Ph.D., University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Clay Fuqua, Ph.D., Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Michael Gale, Jr., Ph.D., University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle
  • Richard L. Gallo, M.D., Ph.D., University of California, San Diego
  • Andrea Gamarnik, Ph.D., Fundación Instituto Leloir, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Daniel E. Goldberg, M.D., Ph.D., Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Kim Y. Green, Ph.D., NIAID,NIH, Bethesda, MD
  • Nancy L. Haigwood, Ph.D., Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton
  • Stephen L. Hajduk, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Athens
  • Reuben S. Harris, Ph.D., University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
  • Seyed Ehtesham Hasnain, Ph.D., DMedSc, FNA, FTWAS, ML, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi
  • Gary B. Huffnagle, Ph.D., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Laura Katz, Ph.D., Smith College, Northampton, MA
  • Scott Keeney, Ph.D., Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Howard Hughes Medical Center, New York, NY
  • Vassilis Koronakis, Ph.D., University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Ulrich Kück, Ph.D., Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany
  • Peter Kwong, Ph.D., Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD
  • Nikos Kyrpides, Ph.D., US Department of Energy - Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA
  • Peter Lipke, Ph.D., Brooklyn College of City University of New York
  • Jeremy Luban, M.D., University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
  • Julius Lukeš, Ph.D., Institute of Parasitology, Biology Centre, AS CR, v.v.i., Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
  • Victoria Lundblad, Ph.D., The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA
  • Hiten D. Madhani, M.D., Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco
  • Alexander Mankin, Ph.D., Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Didier Mazel, Ph.D., Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
  • Jacques F. Meis, M.D., Ph.D., Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital, Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Trudy G. Morrison, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
  • Joshua D. Nosanchuk, M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
  • Thomas Nutman, M.D., NIH, Bethesda, MD
  • Tom HM Ottenhoff, M.D., Ph.D., Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands
  • Leslie Parent, M.D., Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey
  • Marilyn Parsons, Ph.D., Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, WA
  • Sharon Peacock, Ph.D., University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Theodore Pierson, Ph.D., NIAID, Bethesda, MD
  • Steven A. Porcelli, M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
  • Firdausi Qadri, Ph.D., International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases, Bangladesh, Dhaka
  • Andrew F. Read, D.Phil., Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Alan Rein, Ph.D., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, NCI, MD
  • Andrew Roger, Ph.D., Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Paul Ross, Ph.D, D.Sc, Teagasc Food Research Programme, Moorepark, Fermoy, Ireland
  • Matthew S. Sachs, Ph.D., Texas A&M University, College Station
  • Siba Samal, Ph.D., D.V.M., University of Maryland, College Park
  • Erica Ollmann Saphire, Ph.D., The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA
  • Chihiro Sasakawa, Ph.D., Medical Mycology Research Center, Chiba University, Japan
  • Karla J. Satchell, Ph.D., Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL
  • Donald W. Schaffner, Ph.D., Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
  • Michael G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • Anca Segall, Ph.D., San Diego State University, CA
  • Anne E. Simon, Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park
  • Gregory Siragusa, Ph.D., Danisco/DuPont, Waukesha, WI
  • Lotte Sogaard-Andersen, M.D., Ph.D., Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg, Germany
  • Deborah Spector, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, CA
  • David S. Stephens, M.D., Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
  • Sebastian Suerbaum, M.D., Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany
  • Curtis A. Suttle, Ph.D., University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Ronald Swanstrom, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • M. Stephen Trent, Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin
  • Christian Tschudi, Ph.D., Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT
  • John C. Vederas, Ph.D., University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
  • Waldemar Vollmer, Ph.D., Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
  • Haruo Watanabe, M.D., Ph.D., National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Casey T. Weaver, M.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Raymond M. Welsh, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
  • Marvin Whiteley, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
  • Martin Wiedmann, Ph.D., Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • Sandra L. Wolin, M.D., Ph.D., Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Liping Zhao, Ph.D., Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
  • Zhi-Ming Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., NCI, NIH, Rockville, MD

To learn more about the American Academy of Microbiology and find more information about the AAM Fellows Program, visit http://academy.asm.org

 

About the American Academy of Microbiology

The American Academy of Microbiology (Academy) is the honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the world's oldest and largest life science organization. The mission of the Academy is to recognize scientists for outstanding contributions to microbiology and provide microbiological expertise in the service of science and the public. 

The Academy was formed in 1955 as a corporation independent of the ASM (then the Society of American Bacteriologists) by a group of distinguished microbiologists interested in their professional organization broadening its mission and activities. In 1969, the Council of the ASM and the Academy's Board of Governors voted to merge. It was determined that the Academy would function as one of the "arms" of ASM and would be responsible for professional affairs, which included promoting training programs to ensure a supply of well-qualified microbiologists, establishing and maintaining a code of ethics, developing certification and registration boards as needed, and ensuring the professional well-being of microbiologists whose opportunities may be subject to actions of legislative or other professional bodies. In 2011, the Professional Practices Committee was formed with the mission to provide professional development opportunities and content to members to increase their skill, enhance their job performance and contribute to the profession. The American College of Microbiology is a core component of this committee, and is no longer a part of the Academy.

Today, the Academy serves as a resource to governmental agencies, industry, ASM and the larger scientific and lay communities by convening colloquia to address critical issues in microbiology. The Academy convenes four to five colloquia a year for in-depth analysis of critical issues in microbiology. The Academy manages ASM's scientific achievement awards program, recognizing outstanding achievement and potential in all areas of microbiology.

 

How to Apply


Qualifications

Prospective fellows must be citizens of the United States and are expected to have completed their Ph.D. by the time the fellowship begins. Candidates are expected to show competence in some aspect of microbiology, have a broad background in science and technology, and have interest and some experience in applying scientific knowledge toward the solution of social problems. Candidates are expected to be excellent writers, articulate, literate, adaptable, interested in work on a range of microbiology issues, and able to work with a variety of people from diverse professional backgrounds.

Application

A complete application for the fellowship must include:

  1. A letter from the candidate indicating a desire to apply and listing three references.

  2. Three letters of references.

    Reference letters should address: The reference's relationship to candidate; An evaluation of the technical accomplishments and relative standing of the candidate among his or her peers; The candidate's known interest and experience in applying his or her expertise to the solution of societal problems; The candidates ability to communicate and to interact productively with individuals and groups; An assessment of the candidate's maturity and judgmental ability; and An opinion about the candidate's professional future.

    References should include individuals who can discuss not only the candidate's professional competence but also other aspects of his or her background interests which would make the applicant particularly qualified to serve as a Colloquium Fellow.

  3. A statement from the candidate about his or her qualifications and career goals. The candidate's statement should not exceed 1,000 words. The statement should cover the following areas: Why the fellowship is desired; How the candidate is qualified for the Fellowship; and What outcome is hoped for relative to the candidate's career goals.

  4. An updated C.V.

Applications, reference letters, and questions should be addressed to:

Colloquium Program Fellowship
American Academy of Microbiology
American Society for Microbiology
1752 N Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: (202) 942-9227
Fax: (202) 942-9353
Email: colloquia@asmusa.org

Applications due May 15, 2012.

Candidates selected for interviews must provide travel to and from Washington at their own expense. The candidate is responsible for soliciting the required references, providing the six guidelines for the reference response and seeing that the references are forwarded before the deadline.

 

Academy

Welcome to the American Academy of Microbiology!

The American Academy of Microbiology (Academy) is the honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the world's oldest and largest life science organization. The mission of the Academy is to recognize scientists for outstanding contributions to microbiology and provide microbiological expertise in the service of science and the public. 

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Subcategories

  • Annual AAM Election
  • Colloquia Materials
  • COLLOQUIA REPORTS
  • Fellows Elected in 2010
    Seventy-eight microbiologists were elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology in January, 2010.  Fellows of the Academy are elected annually through a highly selective, peer-review process, based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology. There are now over 2,000 Fellows representing all subspecialties of microbiology, including basic and applied research, teaching, public health, industry, and government service. The new Fellows are as follows:
  • Interviews with Fellows

    The following interviews were published in previous issues of News and Views and were conducted by Merry Buckley, a freelance science writer.

  • Navigation
  • Fellows Elected in 2012
  • Virtual Speaker Program

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