Welcome to the ASM Newsroom, a resource for journalists seeking information relating to the microbiological sciences.  Members of the media and the general public can access current and archived press releases from the Society as well as tipsheets highlighting the latest research published in our journals or presented at our meetings.

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Experimental Approach to Flu Prevention Could Block Multiple Strains

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 20, 2015 - A new biologic drug prevented death when administered to mice a week in advance of lethal challenge with influenza H7N9, a disease that has shown a  roughly 30 percent mortality rate in humans. The biologic had previously proven protective in mice against the pandemic...

01-30-2015

Buffer Zone Guidelines May Be Inadequate to Protect Produce From Feedlot Contamination

WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 23, 2014 - The pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 can spread, likely airborne, more than one tenth mile downwind from a cattle feedlot onto nearby produce, according to a paper published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. The high percentages of leafy greens contaminated with E....

01-05-2015

Commensal bacteria were critical shapers of early human populations

WASHINGTON, DC - December 16, 2014 – Using mathematical modeling, researchers at New York and Vanderbilt universities have shown that commensal bacteria that cause problems later in life most likely played a key role in stabilizing early human populations.

12-16-2014

Enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide are closely related

WASHINGTON, DC - November 13, 2014 -- The strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that infect adults and children in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, have notably similar toxins and virulence factors, according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology. That bodes well for vaccine development, says corresponding author...

11-20-2014

Engineered for Tolerance, Bacteria Pump Out Higher Quantity of Renewable Gasoline

WASHINGTON, DC—November 4, 2014—An international team of bioengineers has boosted the ability of bacteria to produce isopentenol, a compound with desirable gasoline properties. The finding, published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, is a significant step toward developing a bacterial strain that can yield...

11-06-2014

Ebola, Marburg Viruses Edit Genetic Material During Infection

WASHINGTON, DC – November 4, 2014 – Filoviruses like Ebola “edit” genetic material as they invade their hosts, according to a study published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The work, by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,...

11-04-2014

Study Suggests Altering Gut Bacteria Might Mitigate Lupus

WASHINGTON, DC – October 20, 2014 -- Lactobacillus species, commonly seen in yogurt cultures, correlate, in the guts of mouse models, with mitigation of lupus symptoms, while Lachnospiraceae, a type of Clostridia, correlate with worsening, according to research published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. "Our results suggest that the same investigation shold...

10-24-2014

Versatile Antibiotic Found With Self-Immunity Gene On Plasmid In Staph Strain

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 13, 2014 - A robust, broad spectrum antibiotic, and a gene that confers immunity to that antibiotic are both found in the bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain 115. The antibiotic, a member of the thiopeptide family of antibiotics, is not in widespread use, partly due to its...

10-13-2014

Plants Prepackage Beneficial Microbes in Their Seeds

WASHINGTON, DC – September 29, 2014 -- Plants have a symbiotic relationship with certain bacteria. These ‘commensal’ bacteria help the pants extract nutrients and defend against invaders – an important step in preventing pathogens from contaminating fruits and vegetables. Now, scientists have discovered that plants may package their commensal bacteria inside...

09-29-2014

Sweat-Eating Bacteria May Improve Skin Health

WASHINGTON, DC – September 29, 2014 – Bacteria that metabolize ammonia, a major component of sweat, may improve skin health and some day could be used for the treatment of skin disorders, such as acne or chronic wounds. In a study conducted by AOBiome LLC, human volunteers using the bacteria reported...

09-29-2014

 

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