CAREER DEVELOPMENT

photo 0170461730ighdrhIn today’s world, direct engagement with those outside of science is critical not only to communicating what we’ve discovered, but also to promoting an atmosphere of trust between scientists and the public. Direct engagement can mean many things, but for me, public outreach is a powerful and immediate means of bridging the gap.

Published in Career Planning

Business Management Crop 2You’ve finally landed a job in research & development or in the clinical research division at a pharmaceutical or biotechnology company. After spending, a few years mastering your job, you might be thinking of moving into the business side of your company and ask yourself “How much business experience/background do I need to be competitive for a management position within industry?” We interviewed Dr. Alita Miller of Entasis Therapeutics and Dr. Sarah McHatton of Novozymes to get their insights on this question.

Published in Career Planning
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 16:50

How to Pick a Post-Doc Position

Test Tubes Final2One of the challenges for any PhD candidate is to decide if they want to pursue a post-doctoral position after graduation.  This challenge can become more daunting when decisions need to be made about where (and under who) this post-doc should be conducted as well as the post-doctoral research topic.  However, it’s important to know that you are not alone in making these types of decisions. Microbe Mentor reached out to three relatively new post-docs, regarding their post-doc decisions.  Despite different backgrounds, they collectively agreed that it was critical to first determine what was important to them. The factors and their importance played out differently for each of the three interviewed post-docs. 

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RightQuestions ImageYou’ve heard about Medical Science Liaison (MSL) positions and even know alumni from your institution that have entered the field, but what does a MSL actually do?  Is it a sales position?  Is there a lot of travel? When you’re looking for answers to these myriad of questions, who do you turn to? How about someone who is currently in the job in the form of an informational interview? To learn how to do informational interviews and why they are important, check out the article.

Published in Career Planning
Wednesday, 21 September 2016 10:45

A Step-by-Step Guide to Finding your Career Goals

The career planning process can start at any time, but the overall rule is the sooner the better. The rule applies to anyone -  whether you’re a junior undergraduate, 1st year graduate student, postdoctoral fellow or somewhere in between. The career planning process includes four steps: 1) Understanding You – What are your interests, values, and skills? 2) Exploration – What are the current career paths in the workforce and which do you find most interesting? 3) Building Yourself and Your Network – What skills, experiences, and people do you need to get to career X, Y, or Z? 4) Job Search – How do you put together a job application and execute the interview successfully? This process is important because it will help you shape your career aspirations and make you more marketable for a particular career. In return, these steps will make it easier for you to put your application materials together, including: cover letters, resumes, CVs, teaching philosophies, etc.

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How critical is a postdoc if I want to teach at a primarily undergraduate or 2-year institution?

To bring a broad perspective to the issue, Microbe Mentor editor Thomas Hanson asked three microbiologists at different career stages and types of institutions for their thoughts. Dr. Amy Cheng Vollmer is a Professor of Biology at Swarthmore College, Dr. Virginia Balke is an Instructor and Project Director at Delaware Technical Community College (DTCC), and Dr. Carie Frantz is an Assistant Professor of Geochemistry and Biogeoscience at Weber State University.

Dr. Vollmer’s research focuses on the stress response in Escherichia coli, and is moving towards microbiome characterization. She is the sole microbiologist in a Biology Department, where she has served twice as Department Chair. Research experience for students is an important part of the curriculum at Swarthmore and Dr. Vollmer has hosted over 70 students in her lab to date. She has previously written about her job in the August 2000 ASM News (66:459-462).

Published in Career Planning

How important is it to do a postdoc if you want to pursue careers in science communication or policy?

This is an increasingly common question, so thanks for asking Microbe Mentor! The vast majority (~70%) of science Ph.D. students pursue a postdoc after graduation. However, you may wonder if it’s really necessary to do so if pursuing a non-research career such as science communication or science policy. To help answer this question, Microbe Mentor reached out to Erica Siebrasse, Ph.D., and Erika Shugart, Ph.D., for their insights.

Dr. Erica Siebrasse, the Education and Professional Development Manager at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, details how to successfully make the transition from academia to science communication or policy. Dr. Erika Shugart, Director of Communications and Strategic Marketing at ASM, explains what she looks for in candidates when she hires.

Both agree that it is not necessary to do a postdoc for careers in science policy or communication. However, it is necessary to have a solid plan and be passionate about the career path you choose.

Published in Career Planning

ASM members have expressed a significant interest in being able to gain career advice from microbiologists who have “been there and done that” and ASM has responded with an article on what advice they would give to their younger selves.

Published in Career Planning

Careers within Clinical Laboratory Science, specifically Clinical Microbiology, are challenging and rewarding. Although not at the patient bedside, bench-level technologists play an integral role in the network of clinical decision making by providing accurate and critical information to the healthcare team. Those who are familiar with the duties and responsibilities of laboratory bench-work relish in the ability to contribute to patient care. However, many also seek the ability to progress within the field.

The goal of this PDF document is to introduce bench-level clinical microbiologists to the opportunities which are available to those who seek to progress within the field while staying connected to the patient care that many revere. Here we present examples of positions which may be available to you within your respective institutions. Further, we also present suggestions which will help to enrich your experience and build your resume to help prepare you to be a competitive candidate for promotion. Note that advanced degrees (e.g. Ph.D., D.O., and M.D.) will not be covered here and are beyond the scope of this guide.

Published in Career Planning

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