Minority Microbiology Mentor Newsletter - April 2016

ASM ACTIVITIES

  • ASM Microbe 2016 Conference - Science Storytelling: Engaging the Audience as You Advance Your Career
  • ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship
  • Undergraduate Faculty Research Initiative Fellowships
  • ASM Grant Writing Course
  • ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Course
  • 32nd Clinical Virology Symposium
  • ASM Microbe 2016
  • Upcoming ASM Conferences
  • Clinical Microbiology Mentoring Committee (CMMC)
  • 2017 Award Nominations

FEDERAL AGENCY ACTIVITIES

  • Novel Strategies for Targeting HIV-CNS Reservoirs without Reactivation (R01)
  • Identification of Small Molecules for Sustained-Release Anti-HIV Products (R01)
  • Strengthen and Promote the Role of Local Health Departments in Retail Food Safety Regulation (U50)
  • Division of Integrative Organismal Systems
  • NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program (S-STEM)

ARTICLES OF INTEREST AND OTHER UPDATES

  • Director, Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
  • Ph.D. position in plant-microbial interactions
  • Postdoc in Evolutionary ecology and genomics of social insects
  • Postdoc in microbial saprobe community structure (GWU)
  • Postdoc fellowship in soil microbial ecology
  • Postdoc in Stream Microbial Ecology at Loyola University Chicago
  • Postdoc Research Opportunity in Wetland Plant Ecology at LUMCON

SPOTLIGHT ON MINORITY MICROBIOLOGISTS

  • Drs. Adrian Lopez Garcia de Lomana, Jacob Valenzuela, and Warren Carter

ASM ACTIVITIES

American Society for Microbiology Microbe 2016 Conference - Science Storytelling: Engaging the Audience as You Advance Your Career (Session 034-WS)
June 16, 2016, 12:45 PM - 4:15 PM
Seaport World Trade Center (WTC), Harborview Ballroom 1
Must Register By Wednesday, April 20!

DESCRIPTION
ASM members are called upon to explain why their research is important to society. Stories are one of the most compelling ways to describe your work to students, colleagues, supervisors, donors, patients, news media, legislators, family and friends. In this workshop, you will discover the power of stories, and then do some storytelling exercises to get you started (and laughing, crying or cringing). Everyone has an endless supply of stories and we’ll show you where to find them in your lab or office. You’ll practice telling stories and get feedback from friends. We’ll teach you how to develop your story structure, use body language and evoke human emotions without sounding silly. We’ll also give you some guidance on how to use metaphors, end right on time, and adjust your story for different audiences. You’ll leave the workshop with practical skills for telling memorable (and entertaining!) stories that are clear, concise and compelling.

Upon completion of this workshop, the participant should be able to:

  • Identify where wonderful ideas for stories can be found in our research labs, offices or professional lives.
  • Use creative verbal and nonverbal (i.e., body language) skills to tell interesting and memorable stories about science.
  • Adjust a story based on the needs and interests of the audience.

CE HOURS:  3.5

To Learn More and Register:  go to MICROBE 2016

ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship
Senior-level graduate students are invited to apply for a 2016 ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship. With an aim to increase the number of students from underrepresented minority groups who complete doctoral degrees in the microbial sciences, the Watkins fellowship provides students with support to complete and present their microbiology research. Fellows are allowed to participate in an Education-Board-sponsored professional development program one time during the three-year tenure and – dependent on abstract submission and acceptance – are supported to present their research at the ASM Microbe Meeting. Apply by May 1. To learn more, visit http://bit.ly/watkins16nl.

Undergraduate Faculty Research Initiative Fellowships
Early-career (and future) undergraduate STEM educators are encouraged to apply for a 2016 ASM-NSF LINK Undergraduate Faculty Research Initiative (UFRI) Fellowship. This nascent professional development resource trains STEM faculty to develop undergraduate research programs by initiating successful research partnerships. As part of the fellowship, LINK will provide travel subsidies of up to $2,000 to (i) increase participation of undergraduate STEM educators at eight eligible ASM-sponsored research conferences, (ii) encourage networking and collaborations with potential research partners, and (iii) access resources and mentoring to advance undergraduate research programs. Fellowship applications are accepted on a rolling basis for each of the eight conferences. The deadline is June 6 to be considered for a UFRI fellowship for the ASM Conference on Streptococcal Genetics or the ASM Conference on Experimental Microbial Evolution (each takes place in Washington, D.C.) To learn more, visit http://www.asmlink.org/ufri.

ASM Grant Writing Course
Senior-level graduate students, postdoctoral scientists, and early-career scientists are invited to apply for the ASM Grant Writing Course (formerly the ASM Kadner Institute). Sponsored by the ASM Committee on Graduate and Postdoctoral Education to meet the growing need for guidance and support on grant applications, the course will take place 12-14 August 2016 in Washington, D.C. The course will emphasize excellence in grantsmanship, and participants will receive in-person mentoring, real-time constructive feedback, and best practice strategies for composing effective grant proposals. The application deadline is June 30. ASM offers the Grant Writing Course with partial support from the ASM-NSF Leaders Inspiring Networks and Knowledge (LINK) Program and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. For additional program details, such as costs and eligibility criteria, please visit http://bit.ly/asmgw16nl.

ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Course
The ASM Committee on Graduate and Postdoctoral Education welcomes applications to the ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Course, an effort that supports beginning researchers in understanding the writing, publishing, and review processes for scientific journals. Set for 12-14 August 2016 in Washington, D.C., the course is led by ASM members who have published widely, reviewed manuscripts, and served on the editorial boards of major journals. Program benefits include one-on-one feedback from facilitators, writing practice, and stimulating group discussions and interactions. The course is open to senior-level graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career scientists who are ready for an immersive and intensive writing experience. The application deadline is June 30. ASM offers the Scientific Writing and Publishing Course with partial support from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. For additional program details, such as costs and eligibility criteria, please visit http://bit.ly/swpc16nl.

32nd Clinical Virology Symposium
May 19–22, 2016 | Daytona Beach, Florida
http://www.asm.org/cvs2016
Last chance to register! Join your peers at this leading event to learn the latest breakthroughs in clinical and diagnostic virology.

ASM Microbe 2016
June 16–20, 2016 | Boston, Massachusetts
http://www.asm.org/microbe2016
Register today and you could win a $100 American Express gift card! Make sure to enter code Microbe2016 on your hard copy or online registration form to be entered into the drawing.

Early bird registration deadline: May 5, 2016

Upcoming ASM Conferences
http://www.asm.org/conferences

13th ASM Conference on Candida and Candidiasis
April 13–17, 2016 | Seattle, Washington

@ASM Conference – Special President's Edition on What Does the Biology of Flaviviruses Tell Us About Zika: The Importance of Fundamental Virus Biology
June 1, 2016 | Washington, DC

ASM Conference on Streptococcal Genetics
July 31–August 3, 2016 | Washington, DC
Abstract submission deadline: May 23, 2016
Early bird registration deadline: June 23, 2016

2nd ASM Conference on Experimental Microbial Evolution 
August 4–7, 2016 | Washington, DC

Abstract submission deadline: May 26, 2016
Early bird registration deadline: June 23, 2016

5th ASM Conference on Salmonella
August 29–September 1, 2016 | Potsdam, Germany
Abstract submission deadline: June 24, 2016
Early bird registration deadline: July 21, 2016

Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE)
July 21-24, 2016 | North Bethesda, Maryland
Early-bird registration deadline: May 16, 2016

Save the dates for more 2016 ASM Conferences!

Clinical Microbiology Mentoring Committee (CMMC)
Interested in a career in clinical microbiology? Contact a mentor for clinical microbiology career advice! The CMMC was created to help those interested in or recently embarked on a career in clinical microbiology. Mentors are available to help navigate your career path and give advice on furthering your career. Stay informed on the CMMC’s current projects, grant, and mentoring materials by following their newsletter.

2017 Award Nominations
Deadline: May 1, 2016
Click here to nominate: http://bit.ly/1U50tP5


FEDERAL AGENCY ACTIVITIES

Novel Strategies for Targeting HIV-CNS Reservoirs without Reactivation (R01)
This funding opportunity announcement invites research grant applications focused on: identifying HIV-1-infected cells in the central nervous system (CNS) compartment that are latently infected; developing strategies for targeting these latently infected cells; and aiming to achieve viral silencing leading to inhibition of viral production, without the need for pro-viral reactivation.    Letters of intent are due August 9, 2016, and more information is available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-17-101.html.

Identification of Small Molecules for Sustained-Release Anti-HIV Products (R01)
The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to solicit applications from single institutions, or consortia of institutions, to identify existing anti-HIV molecules, or discover new highly potent and selective anti-HIV small molecules, with the potential for development as sustained release products (SRP) with a dosing interval from once a week to once every three months or longer.    Letters of intent are due July 1, 2016, and more information is available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-16-024.html.

Strengthen and Promote the Role of Local Health Departments in Retail Food Safety Regulation (U50)
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is issued to announce the availability of a cooperative agreement to be awarded under a Limited Competition. FDA announces the availability of funding and requests applications to strengthen and promote the role of local health departments in retail food safety regulation and support effective city and county regulatory programs responsible for retail food protection in the United States (U.S.).  Funds will be awarded to a national association/organization to administer and award funds to jurisdictions selected for a mentorship program, and conduct research needed to facilitate long-term improvements and advancement of retail food regulatory programs. The funding will strengthen and promote retail food protection in the U.S.  Letters of intent are due April 26, 2016, and more information is available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-FD-16-019.html.

Division of Integrative Organismal Systems
The Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS) supports research aimed at understanding why organisms are structured the way they are and function as they do. Proposals should focus on organisms as a fundamental unit of biological organization. Principal Investigators (PIs) are encouraged to apply systems approaches that will lead to conceptual and theoretical insights and predictions about emergent organismal properties. Areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to, developmental biology and the evolution of developmental processes, nervous system development, structure, and function, physiological processes, functional morphology, symbioses, interactions of organisms with biotic and abiotic environments, and animal behavior.  Full proposals are due April 29, 2016, and more information is available at http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16505/nsf16505.htm.

NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program (S-STEM)
A well-educated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce is a significant contributor to maintaining the competitiveness of the U.S. in the global economy. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) program addresses the need for a high quality STEM workforce in STEM disciplines supported by the program and for the increased success of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need who are pursuing associate, baccalaureate, or graduate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).  Recognizing that financial aid alone cannot increase retention and graduation in STEM, the program provides awards to Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) to fund scholarships and to advance the adaptation, implementation, and study of effective evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities that support recruitment, retention, transfer (if appropriate), student success, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM. The S-STEM program encourages collaborations among different types of partners: Partnerships among different types of institutions; collaborations of STEM faculty and institutional, educational, and social science researchers; and partnerships among institutions of higher education and local business and industry, if appropriate.  The program seeks: 1) to increase the number of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need obtaining degrees in STEM and entering the workforce or graduate programs in STEM; 2) to improve the education of future scientists, engineers, and technicians, with a focus on academically talented low-income students; and 3) to generate knowledge to advance understanding of how factors or evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities affect the success, retention, transfer, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM of low-income students.  Full proposals are due May 16, 2016, and more information is available at http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16540/nsf16540.htm.


ARTICLES OF INTEREST AND OTHER UPDATES

Director, Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the largest Institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is seeking an exceptional and visionary leader for the position of director of the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (DMID). NIAID supports and conducts basic, translational, and clinical research to better understand, treat, and prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases.

DMID supports research to prevent and control diseases caused by virtually all human infectious agents with the exception of HIV. DMID projects include basic biology of human pathogens and their interaction with human hosts, as well as translational and clinical research toward the development of new and improved diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines for infectious diseases. DMID provides funding opportunities and a comprehensive set of resources for researchers as part of an extramural research portfolio that currently encompasses 300 different organisms, including emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases such as pandemic influenza, Ebola and Zika viruses, and drug-resistant microbes. The division has a budget of $1.48B (FY 2015) and is composed of six scientific branches and six research support offices with nearly 200 staff members.

The DMID director reports to the NIAID director and provides scientific direction, oversight, and management for this large, complex, and dynamic extramural research program. The DMID director serves as a principal advisor to the NIAID director on biomedical scientific affairs involving infectious diseases other than HIV. The DMID director also serves as an expert consultant, advisor, and spokesperson both nationally and internationally on NIAID infectious disease research activities. 

DMID seeks exceptional candidates for the director position.

Key responsibilities of the DMID director position include developing, directing, and coordinating DMID’s basic, translational, and clinical extramural research programs; demonstrating strategic vision to advance the infectious diseases research agenda and field; proactively evaluating research needs on a national and international scale and developing and recommending new programs as needed; formulating and implementing plans for solicitation of new research; overseeing program operations, program planning, and evaluation; managing resource allocations to include staff, physical, and financial resources; recommending policies for the execution of multidisciplinary research; and establishing and maintaining research collaborations with industry and public sector organizations.

Qualifications

Applicants must have an earned M.D., Ph.D., or equivalent degree, be a U.S. citizen, and exhibit exceptional leadership ability managing complex basic, translational, and clinical research programs. Applicants must have experience leading research programs encompassing the frontiers of fields such as immunology, the biology of infectious agents, the development of strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases, and the development of novel tools and technologies to advance basic and clinical research efforts. The successful candidate will possess the training and experience to lead complex, multidisciplinary, and collaborative activities required to deliver scientific discoveries that will illuminate our understanding of human health and disease. The selected candidate must obtain and maintain a Top Secret security clearance based on a special background investigation with eligibility for sensitive compartmented information (SCI).

Application

Salary is commensurate with experience, and a full package of benefits is available, including retirement, health and life insurance, long-term care insurance, leave, and Thrift Savings Plan (401k equivalent). Email a one- to two-page cover letter describing the reasons for your interest in the position and your scientific management experience, resume, curriculum vitae, and bibliography to NIAID-DMIDDirector-Apply. Electronic applications are preferred; however, you may submit paper applications to NIAID-DMIDDirector-Apply, NIAID Office of Workforce Effectiveness and Resources, 5601 Fishers Lane, Room 2G69 Bethesda, MD 20892-9817. 

Email NIAID-DMIDDirector-Apply with questions or for more information about the position.

Review of applications will begin on or about March 30, 2016. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. All information provided by applicants will remain confidential and will be reviewed only by authorized officials of NIAID.

Visit Careers at NIAID to learn more about NIAID and how you can play a role in this exciting and dynamic research organization.

NIH is dedicated to building an inclusive and diverse community in its training and employment programs. HHS, NIH, and NIAID are equal opportunity employers.

Ph.D. Position in Plant-microbial Interactions
In the Group of Plant Nutrition we combine basic research on mechanisms driving and mediating plant nutrition with field trials to solve topical problems in plant production. In the multidisciplinary team, we are recruiting a motivated PhD student for a project that combines community ecological analyses of microbial root symbionts with plant physiological ecological analyses to mechanistically elucidate microbe-plant-soil feedbacks. Desirable skills include experience in working with next generation DNA sequencing data (metagenomics), including associated bioinformatic analyses, and use of natural abundances of stable isotopes. The successful applicant will also be required to interview local farmers in a socio-economic component of the project. Requirements include an MSc in plant science (environmental or agricultural sciences) or (microbial) ecology, good spoken and written English, and a driver’s license. Funding is guaranteed for three years by the collaboration between the Mercator Research Foundation and the World Food System Center at ETH, via the ETH Foundation. Salary follows the fixed salary rates for doctoral students at ETH. For further information please contact Dr. Hannes Gamper (no applications) by email: hannes.gamper@usys.ethz.ch, or Prof Johannes J. Le Roux by email: jleroux@sun.ac.za and/or visit the working group’s websites: http://www.plantnutrition.ethz.ch, http://academic.sun.ac.za/cib/team_research.asp.  Applications online with a short motivation letter describing your reasons for applying and qualifications for the position, a detailed CV, and contact details of three referees by April 15, 2016 to: ETH Zurich, Olivier Link to apply: https://apply.refline.ch/845721/4483/pub/1/index.html

Postdoc in Evolutionary ecology and genomics of social insects
The Sheehan lab at Cornell University seeks a postdoc for evolutionary ecology projects using comparative and/or population genomics in Polistes paper wasps. Start date is flexible. Information about salary and benefits at Cornell can be found here: https://postdocs.cornell.edu/postdoctoral-associatesbenefits. The lab is especially interested in using comparative and population genetic approaches to examine the ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences of cooperative nesting and visual recognition in wasps, though postdocs are very much encouraged to develop independent projects making use of population and comparative genomic data being generated by the lab. Required qualifications: Ph.D. or equivalent degree in biology, evolution, ecology, genetics, bioinformatics, or related field. Publication of work based on dissertation. Working knowledge of bioinformatics pipelines and standard population genomic analyses. Prior wet lab or field experience is not required. To apply please submit a cover letter describing your relevant experience and research interests as they relate to the system, a CV, the contact information for three references, and 1-2 relevant publications to Dr. Michael Sheehan. Diversity and inclusion are a part of Cornell University's heritage. Cornell is a recognized employer and educator valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities. Please feel free to contact me at the above email address with any questions. Michael J Sheehan Assistant Professor Neurobiology and Behavior Cornell University 215 Tower Rd Ithaca NY, 14853 (607) 254-4302 msheehan@cornell.edu.   

Postdoc in microbial saprobe community structure (GWU)
A postdoc position is available in the Zanne lab at George Washington University with a flexible start date. The postdoc will work on collaborative projects related to the microbial colonization of wood. These projects include: 1. Analyzing multi-year microbial community data from an NSF-funded project in St. Louis, MO, USA, and 2. Measuring plant anatomical, morphological and chemical wood traits and characterizing fungal community composition using DNA-based and functional approaches for an Australian Research Council-funded experiment in Sydney, Australia, in collaboration with Will Cornwell (University of New South Wales) and Jeff Powell (Western Sydney University). Motivated applicants with skills in microbial community analyses are especially encouraged to apply. Applicants should have a PhD in a relevant field and strong writing and quantitative skills. Applications will be reviewed as received and the position will remain open until filled. Applications should include a research statement, including relevant skills for the project and future goals (max: 1-2 pages), curriculum vitae, and contact information for three references (including emails and phone numbers). Materials should be sent to Amy Zanne: aezanne@gmail.com.  

Postdoc fellowship in soil microbial ecology
Sylvie Quideau, Ed Bork, and Cameron Carlyle at the University of Alberta are seeking a motivated postdoc fellow to join a collaborative project investigating soil microbial response to disturbance in mixedgrass prairies. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in soil microbiology, biogeochemistry, or microbial ecology. Experience with molecular approaches to characterize community composition and function is required. Strong verbal, written, and computational skills are essential. The project is funded by an NSERC-CRD grant. The successful candidate will be provided with an annual fellowship of CAD 45,000. The position can start immediately and no later than August 2016. The initial appointment period will be for one year with the potential of renewal for an additional year. Interested candidates should e-mail their transcript, a detailed curriculum vitae, a cover letter that summarizes their qualifications and research goals, and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Sylvie Quideau at sylvie.quideau@ualberta.ca. Only successful candidates will be contacted. 

Postdoc in Stream Microbial Ecology at Loyola University Chicago
Loyola University Chicago (LUC), College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Biology invites applications for a full-time postdoc, with expertise in the area of stream microbial ecology. The position is for one year with the possibility of renewal for a second year based on performance. For more information about the department visit www.luc.edu/biology. The postdoc will work with Dr. John Kelly and Dr. Timothy Hoellein on a funded research project that will seek to quantify and identify sources, sinks, and biological interactions of microplastic particles in the eight major tributaries of Lake Michigan. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in biology, ecology, microbiology, or a related field, experience with stream ecology fieldwork, and a valid U.S. driver’s license. Under- represented minority candidates and those with prior experience in molecular microbial ecology, bioinformatics analysis of highthroughput sequencing data, and/or geographic information systems are especially encouraged to apply. Applicants should apply on-line at http://www.careers.luc.edu and submit a letter of intent, a current Curriculum Vitae, and a brief statement describing their research interests and experience. They also should provide the names and email addresses of three individuals prepared to speak to their professional qualifications for this position. For further information, please contact Dr. Kelly (jkelly7@luc.edu).

Postdoc Research Opportunity in Wetland Plant Ecology at LUMCON
The Roberts Lab of Ecosystem Ecology and Biogeochemistry (http://robertsresearchlab.weebly.com/) at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) is seeking a postdoc in wetland plant ecology to help organize and lead a series field studies and manipulative experiments studying the effects of the Macondo Oil Spill on coastal marsh ecosystems. The position will be based at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) Marine Center in Cocodrie, LA (visit http:///www.lumcon.edu for information on the facility). The field sites are located along the Louisiana coast between LUMCON and the Mississippi River. To Apply: Send 1) a letter of interest that describes your interest in the position, your career goals, and details your work and educational experience most relevant to the position, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) up to 3 relevant reprints, and 4) contact information for 3 references to Dr. Brian Roberts (broberts@lumcon.edu) with “Wetland plant ecology postdoc position” in the subject line. For more information, contact Dr. Brian Roberts by email or phone (985-851-2821). Deadline: Review of applications will commence immediately and continue until the position is filled. 2 LUMCON is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer that actively seeks diversity among its employees.     

SPOTLIGHT ON MINORITY MICROBIOLOGISTS

Drs. Adrian Lopez Garcia de Lomana, Jacob Valenzuela, and Warren Carter

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Photosynthetic microalgae such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamy for short) have the potential to become sustainable biofactories for renewable biofuels and a wide variety of other valuable commodities. However, biofuel production using microalgae is not yet profitable because the underlying economics of production are not favorable. One major challenge in algae-based biofuel manufacturing is that the conditions that stimulate algae to make copious amounts of energy-rich lipids that can be harvested to make “bio oil”, also inhibit algal growth. In an effort to address this challenge, a team lead by Dr. de Lomana at the Institute for Systems Biology studied how stress causes Chlamy to convert photosynthetically sequestered carbon dioxide (CO2) into lipids. Dr. de Lomana and his colleagues discovered that, upon experiencing nitrogen starvation stress, a gene regulatory program in Chlamy triggers a sequence of events spanning 12 minutes to 8 hours. They discovered how this elegantly coordinated sequence of events remodel the metabolism of Chlamy to simultaneously arrest growth and induce lipid accumulation. The systems-level knowledge generated by Dr. de Lomana and his colleagues is a potential game-changer in enabling rational strategies to enhance lipid accumulation by microalgae, thereby making the biofuel market competitive.

This work was carried out by a highly diverse group of researchers at the Baliga Lab, Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA. Leading author, Dr. de Lomana earned a B.S. in Biology and M.S. in Biochemistry from Navarra University, Pamplona, Spain, and a PhD in Biomedicine from Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain. During his postdoc research in Prof. Andreas Wagner group, he worked on (1) how mutations map in parameter space from healthy to disease phenotype, and (2) how to select most likely models given experimental time series data sets. Currently, as a postdoc at the Baliga Lab, his research interests align with gene regulatory network modeling of microorganisms, including how they adapt to structured environments.  Dr. Jacob Valenzuela earned a B.S in Biology with an emphasis on physiology at California Polytechnic State University. His research in phenotypic plasticity of intertidal species led him to pursue a PhD in Biochemistry at Montana State University. Currently, as a postdoctoral fellow, his research primarily focuses on the effect of ocean acidification on marine diatoms as well as continued research oil production in green algae and developing new techniques to enhance their efficiency.  Warren Carter, research associate on the project, earned his B.S. in Biology with a concentration in molecular biology research, from Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA.  In the Baliga Lab, his focus is on how to optimize lipid and biomass production within green-microalgae by rational re-engineering of the organisms’ gene regulatory program.  Other contributors to the project include Drs. Saheed Imam, Serdar Turkarslan, and Monica Orellana.


In July 2006, the Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities (CMIIM) of the American Society for Microbiology Public and Scientific Affairs Board developed a monthly e-newsletter which contains information pertinent to minority microbiologists.  Currently, there are very few minority-based newsletters for scientists, and there are none for microbiologists. 

This e-newsletter provides a central means of distributing pertinent information to underrepresented minorities in the field of microbiology.  Some examples include career advice, networking tips, relevant news articles, unique funding and career opportunities, microbiological issues affecting minorities (e.g., HIV), minority issues affecting microbiologists (e.g., minority retention), and scientific articles published by minorities or by minority-serving institutions (MSIs). 

The target populations are African-Americans, Latino-Americans, Native Americans, Alaska natives, and Pacific Islanders; however, all ASM members are invited to sign up and to share this information with others who may find this e-newsletter beneficial.  

Signing up to receive The Minority Microbiology Mentor is very easy and is open to ASM members and non-members:  simply go to http://asm.org/index.php/component/content/article/31-forms/forms/238-subscribe-to-listserv, enter your email address, and select "MinorityMicroMentor" then submit, and you will receive confirmation of your subscription by email.  If you are an ASM member, you will be prompted to Log In before signing up.

The Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities is chaired by Dwayne W. Boucaud, Ph.D., Professor in the Quinnipiac University Department of Biomedical Sciences in Hamden, CT.  The Minority Microbiology Mentor Editor-in-Chief is Crystal N. Johnson, Ph.D., associate professor at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, LA, and the Associate Editor is Andrea M. Rocha, Ph.D., ORAU postdoctoral research associate within the Biosciences division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN.

The MMM can post employment ads only if they are first featured on the ASM’s Career Connections site:  http://www.asmcareerconnections.org/home/index.cfm?site_id=756. Career Connections is offering a discount for job postings that are featured in the MMM.  Please contact CMIIM@asmusa.org with your ad needs.

For more information about the Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities (CMIIM) go to the committee’s web page:  http://www.asm.org/cmiim

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