Minority Microbiology Mentor Newsletter - March 2009

ASM ACTIVITIES

 

  • ASM Presentation Institute for Graduate Students – Apply Now CMIIM
  • ASM/JGI Summer Bioinformatics Institute – Deadline Extended
  • ASMCUE: Applications and Abstract Submissions Due
  • ASM Undergraduate Teaching Fellowship
  • 2010 ASM-MURF Call for Mentors
  • 109thGeneral Meeting
  • ASM Teleconferences and Webinars
  • 49thInterscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)
  • ASM-UNESCO Visiting Resource Person (VRP) Program
  • ASM International Professorship for Latin America, Africa and Asia
  • ASM/IUSTF Indo-US Professorships
  • ASM International Fellowship for Latin America, Africa and Asia
  • Global Outreach Program
  • ASM Branch Lectureships Program
  • ASM CMIIM Comments on FDA Federal Register Notice, Participation of Certain Population Subsets in Clinical Drug Trials

FEDERAL AGENCY ACTIVITIES

 

  • Microbial Genome Sequencing Program (USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service, NSF)
  • Centers for AIDS Research: D-CFAR, CFAR (P30, NIH) 
  • Recovery Act Limited Competition: NIH Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research (RC1, NIH)

ARTICLES OF INTEREST AND OTHER UPDATES

 

  • NIH NCI Fellowship Opportunities in Technology Transfer
  • Previously Spotlighted Minority Microbiology Scientist, Erle Robertson, Elected AAM Fellow
  • ASCB Funding Opportunities for Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions
  • FDA Commissioner's Fellowship
  • NSF Releases Report on Underrepresented Groups in Science
  • Congressional briefing, "Building a Diverse Scientific Workforce: Collaboration for a Competitive and Healthy Nation," to be co-sponsored by ASM CMIIM
  • Immunologist/Viral Immunologist Position at Tunnell Consulting, Inc. 
  • Technical Sales Consultant Position at Miltenyi Biotec, Inc
  • HIV Virologist Position at RAPID Laboratories

 

SPOTLIGHT ON MINORITY MICROBIOLOGY SCIENTISTS

 

  • Dale Lewis, Ph.D., Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

 


ASM ACTIVITIES

 

ASM Presentation Institute for Graduate Students – Apply Now

March 15, 2009, is the last day for graduate students at the master’s or doctoral level to apply for the ASM Presentation Institute to be held in Philadelphia, Pa., on May 16 and 17, 2009 (immediately prior to the ASM General Meeting). The two-day Institute helps participants develop the skills needed to make successful presentations at scientific meetings and interact professionally with colleagues. For details, see http://www.asmgap.org/.

ASM/JGI Summer Bioinformatics Institute – Deadline Extended

It’s not too late to apply for the ASM/JGI Summer Bioinformatics Institute, which will be held at the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, which will be held in Walnut Creek, Calif., from June 14 to 17, 2009. At the Institute, science, technology, engineering, and math faculty participants learn to interpret and use molecular sequence information to solve problems, providing a framework for developing classroom activities and research projects for undergraduate students. The extended application deadline is March 20, 2009. For details, visit http://www.facultyprograms.org/page03a.shtml.

ASMCUE: Applications and Abstract Submissions Due

Ft. Collins, Colo., the city Money magazine hails as the nation’s second best place to live, will welcome the 2009 ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE) on May 28 to 31. ASMCUE is an interactive four-day conference offering scientific updates and effective teaching strategies to microbiology and biology educators. March 20, 2009, is the last day to (i) receive $100 discounts on early registrations and (ii) submit applications for travel awards; March 30, 2009, is the last day to submit abstracts for Micro Brew sessions; and April 24, 2009, is the last day to register for the conference or withdraw an abstract. For details, see http://www.asmcue.org/.

ASM Undergraduate Teaching Fellowship

ASM is accepting applications for the Undergraduate Teaching Fellowship (UTF), which supports undergraduate students interested in careers as K-12 science teachers. UTF fellows develop and conduct 150-hour (at a minimum) instructional projects in a scientific discipline for a local school or other community organization. Fellows work with mentors at their home institutions and teachers or site coordinators at the host sites. UTF projects begin in the summer and end by the following February. A joint application from the student, faculty mentor, and teacher or site coordinator is required for consideration into the program. The application deadline is April 1, 2009. See index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=51660 for details.

2010 ASM-MURF Call for Mentors

ASM’s Committee on Minority Education seeks microbiologists who are active, and motivated researchers and experienced mentors to participate in the 2010 Microbiology Undergraduate Research Fellowship (MURF) program. The MURF is a 10-week summer program that supports students from institutions with limited research resources with new research opportunities. Mentors must demonstrate institutional support and commitment to microbiology training and accompany their fellows to present research results at the ASM General Meeting. To participate in this national program, created to increase diversity in the microbiological sciences, visit index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1197 and submit a mentor application by April 10, 2009.

109th General Meeting

The 109th General Meeting will be held on May 17-21, 2009 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA. Discounted General Registration and Housing are available through March 20. New This Year! ASM will allow individuals to register for a single day of the 109th General Meeting. If you are unable to break away for the full General Meeting, you can take advantage of this new ASM offering to now participate for a day.

Highlights of this year’s ASM General Meeting:

  • 13 Award Lectures,
  • 120 Symposia and Invited Speakers,
  • 200 Poster Sessions,
  • 22 Pre-Meeting Workshops (May 16 and 17),
  • 12 Sunrise Seminars (for a nominal fee),
  • 3 Student Brown Bag Lunches
  • Exhibits by over 250 companies
  • Exhibit Hall Opening Ceremony and Reception (May 18, 10:00 am)

Dr. Andrew Knoll of Harvard University Botanical Museum is the ASM Lecturer for 2009. He will be giving a talk titled “Microbes and Earth History.” After this session is over the ASM’s Opening Reception will be held at the National Constitution and Visitor’s Center.

First time meeting attendees will have the opportunity to meet Association staff and begin networking with experienced colleagues in an Orientation prior to Opening Session.

Further program information is available in the Preliminary Program and detailed information on the Online Program Viewer. The ASM recently added a Special Interests page to the General Meeting web site. Students, women, minorities, international members or participants of Academy Programs can now find events specific to their interests at General Meeting.

Visit http://gm.asm.org/ for more about the General Meeting program or workshops. Registration and hotel information are also available online.

 

49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)

Abstract submission is now open!

The 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) will be held in San Francisco, California, September 12 – 15, 2009. More than 10,000 physicians, researchers and other healthcare professionals from around the globe gather each year at ICAAC to foster worldwide solutions to the problem of infectious diseases.

To enrich the attendee experience, the ICAAC Program Committee selects a faculty that includes internationally renowned scientists and complements the invited program with slide and poster abstract presentations. The online version of the Call for Abstracts, designed to guide you through the 49th ICAAC abstract preparation and electronic submission process can be found at http://www.icaac.org/.

The International Mentoring Program
Impact the Future of Microbiology - Become an ASM Mentor

Help guide the careers of young scientists by joining the ASM Mentoring Program. Circumstance often limits the ability of early career scientists to make connections with experienced microbiologists worldwide. Interactions with experienced scientists can reinforce junior scientists’ interest in microbiology itself and their confidence in the future of their scientific careers.

Through the International Mentoring Program, experienced ASM members offer assistance to young scientists in many ways: giving career advice, reviewing a paper for publication, advising on a grant application, or hosting a short-term ASM International Fellow. Mentors are never required to render more assistance than their time and resources allow and the program’s Policies and Guidelines promote an effective Mentor/Mentee relationship.

If you are interested in becoming an ASM International Mentoring Program volunteer please visit http://www.asm.org/International/mentor

 

ASM-UNESCO Visiting Resource Person (VRP) Program
Deadline: Rolling

 

Planning an international trip within the next 6 months? UNESCO and ASM offer you the chance to extend your stay and share your knowledge with scientists around the world!

If you will be traveling to a developing nation, on academic or other business, within the next 6 months the ASM/UNESCO International Visiting Resource Person (VRP) Program can offer you the opportunity spend an extra day with colleagues at a university or research institute in a major city. UNESCO will provide funds to cover the cost of the extended stay, making this program a cost-effective way to share your knowledge with others while enhancing your experience of the country. The ASM member is expected to present a seminar to faculty and students at the institution and to spend the rest of the visit as a resource person - discussing ideas for scientific research, curriculum development and international cooperation with local faculty and students.

For additional information on the program and a link to the application, please visit: http://www.asm.org/International/vrp and email your information to: international@asmusa.org.

ASM International Professorship for Latin America, Africa and Asia
Deadline: April 15th, 2009

Take advantage of this opportunity to share your knowledge with young scientists around the world! This program provides funding to support an ASM member from the US who is scientifically recognized in his/her area to teach a hands-on, highly interactive short course on a single topic in the microbiological sciences atan institution of higher learning in Latin America, Africa or Asia.

For more information or to join/search the database of interested visiting professors, please visit: http://www.asm.org/International/professorship.

ASM/IUSTF Indo-US Professorships
Deadline: April 15th, 2009

Take advantage of this opportunity to share your knowledge with young scientists through the Visiting Teaching Professorship or to collaborate with an established scientist through the Visiting Research Professorship.

This professorship encourages partnerships between the United States and India. Sponsored by the Indo-US Science & Technology Forum, the program enables:

  • Microbiologists in India and the United States to visit institutions in the other country to teach an interactive short course on a topic in any of the microbiological disciplines (Teaching Professor).
  • Microbiologists in India to participate in an interactive short course at a US institution on a topic in any of the microbiological disciplines, or conduct a research project in partnership with colleague in a research facility in the U.S. (Research Professor).

Open to ASM members and non-members alike, the program seeks to broaden collaboration between India and the US on issues of global concern.

For more information or to join/search the database of interested visiting professors, please visit: http://www.asm.org/International/professorship.

ASM International Fellowship for Latin America, Africa and Asia
Deadline: April 15th, 2009

The ASM International Fellowships are an opportunity for students from around the world to conduct research with experienced scientists in the United States. This award seeks to promote international collaborations in microbiological research and training. The fellowships are offered to promising young investigatorsin Latin America, Africa or Asia whoare within five years of obtaining, or in the process of obtaining,his/her Masters, PhD, or other equivalent academic degree, and whoare working in any of the microbiology disciplines. The award allows the fellow to visit a host scientist in the US, but is not intended to support travel related to obtaining a degree at the host institution.

For more information or to join/search the database of interested US host professors, please visit: http://www.asm.org/International/fellowship.

Global Outreach Program
ASM – Promoting Microbiology Worldwide!

The ASM Global Outreach Program is one of many ASM efforts to encourage the development of microbiology at home and abroad. The Global Outreach Program provides a way to overcome the economic barriers that prevent scientists in resource-limited countries from enjoying the programs and scientific exchange available through ASM. The Global Outreach Program offers scientists in developing countries free ASM membership and complimentary online subscriptions to MicrobeLibrary and all ASM journals. For the purpose of determining eligibility, ASM relies on the World Bank classification of Low-Income countries and the United Nations Human Development Index (HDI). The Global Outreach Program is for individuals who are citizens of, and actively residing in low-income countries. A full list of eligible countries is available online.

Learn more about this exciting program at: http://www.asm.org/International/globaloutreach

ASM Branch Lectureships Program

The ASM Branch Lectureships (ASMBL) Program (formerly known as Waksman Foundation for Microbiology Lectures) annually selects a scientifically diverse group of outstanding speakers who are available to participate in ASM Branch meetings at the local and regional levels. The program has been sponsoring Branch lectures for more than 38 years, and just in the last 20 years has provided over 450 lectures to thousands of Branch meeting attendees. The Branches continue to give the program high ratings; in surveys conducted to assess the 2007–2008 program, 100% of the Branches responding indicated that they would recommend their Lecturer to others. In addition, 86% of the Lecturers who responded rated their overall experience at the Branches as excellent, and 14% rated it as satisfactory.

The ASMBL program offers students an important opportunity to interact with prominent lecturers representing a wide range of scientific interest areas. Ninetyfive percent of the 2007–2008 Lecturers reported that they had met with students at Branch meetings to present lectures, participate in informal discussions, judge posters, and/or judge oral presentations. More information is available at http://www.asm.org/microbe/index.asp?bid=62092.

ASM CMIIM Comments on FDA Federal Register Notice, Participation of Certain Population Subsets in Clinical Drug Trials

 

The Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities has commented on the participation of certain population subsets in clinical drug trials in response to a request for comments published in the Federal Register in January 2009. These comments were drafted by CMIIM member Dr. Dwayne W. Boucaud. Comments include "The ASM believes that the underrepresentation of minorities in clinical drug trials is detrimental to ensuring the generalization of trial results and subsequent treatments. Given racial disparities in prevalence and outcomes in diseases such as HIV/AIDS, syphilis, tuberculosis and others, inclusion of underrepresented minorities in clinical trials is imperative." The ASM supports the FDA initiative to improve the recruitment of underrepresented populations in clinical drug trials. The full letter is available at index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=63318.

 


 

FEDERAL AGENCY ACTIVITIES

 

Microbial Genome Sequencing Program (USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service, NSF)

Request For Applications (RFA) Number: USDA-CSREES-AFRI-001967

Submission Dates:

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. Eastern time): March 16, 2009

 

Cognizant Program Officer(s):

  • Ann Lichens-Park, National Program Leader, CSREES, U.S. Department of Agriculture, telephone: (202) 401-6460, fax: (202) 401-6488, e-mail to: apark@csrees.usda.gov
  • Daniel Jones, National Program Leader, CSREES, U.S. Department of Agriculture, telephone: (202) 401-6854, e-mail to: djones@csrees.usda.gov
  • Lita M. Proctor, Program Director, Division of Biological Infrastructure, National Science Foundation, telephone: (703) 292-5190, fax: (703) 292-9063, e-mail to: lproctor@nsf.gov

 

Executive Summary

Program Summary: As a collaborative, interagency effort the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Science Foundation (NSF) will be inviting research proposals (i) to support high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of microorganisms (including plasmids, viruses, bacteria, archaea, fungi, oomycetes, protists, microeukaryotes and agriculturally important nematodes) and the metagenomes of mixed microbial communities and (ii) to develop and implement strategies, tools and technologies to make currently available and novel genome sequences more valuable to the user community.

The availability of genome sequences provides the foundation for understanding how microorganisms function and live, and how they interact with their environments and with other organisms. The sequences are expected to be available to and used by a community of investigators to address issues of scientific and societal importance including:

  • Novel aspects of microbial biochemistry, physiology, metabolism, development and cellular biology;
  • The diversity and the roles microorganisms play in complex ecosystems and in global geochemical cycles;
  • The impact that microorganisms have on the productivity and sustainability of agriculture and natural resources (e.g., forestry, soil and water), and on the safety and quality of the nation's food supply; and
  • The organization and evolution of microbial genomes, and the mechanisms of transmission, exchange and reshuffling of genetic information.

A Microbial Genomics Workshop will be held; all awardees in this interagency program are expected to attend.

  • Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant 
  • Estimated Number of Awards: 15 to 20
  • Anticipated Funding Amount: Approximately $10 million is anticipated ($5 million of USDA/CSREES and $5 million of NSF funds), pending availability of funds, with most awards ranging between $100,000 to $1,200,000 total, for periods of up to three years.
  • PLEASE NOTE: USDA/CSREES funding is subject to the availability of appropriation to carry out the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) Competitive Grants Program. Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) reserves the right to amend, delete, or otherwise alter its participation in this program. 
  • CSREES Eligibility Criteria:

The source of USDA/CSREES funds to support the fiscal year (FY) 2009 Microbial Genome Sequencing Program is subject to the availability of appropriations to carry out the AFRI program, the Secretary may award grants to State agricultural experiment stations; colleges and universities; university research foundations; other research institutions and organizations; Federal agencies; national laboratories; private organizations or corporations; individuals; or any group consisting of two or more of the aforementioned entities. Applications from scientists at non-U.S. organizations will not be accepted. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply, provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project.

NSF Eligibility Criteria:

Proposals are invited from academic institutions accredited and having a campus located in the U.S., U.S. non-profit research organizations, and consortia of such organizations with appropriate research and educational facilities. A proposal from a multi-organizational consortium must be submitted by the lead organization as a single proposal. When a consortium of eligible individuals or organizations submits a proposal, a single principal investigator must be designated as the project director (PD) and a single organization must accept overall management responsibility, including the management of intellectual property that may result from the proposed research.

Simultaneous submission of proposals to this program and another federal agency is permissible with prior written approval of the appropriate program officers at each agency involved. Applicants are encouraged to establish international collaborations where appropriate. It is anticipated that foreign agencies will support the offshore activities of these programs. The NSF component of this program will not make awards or allow subcontracts to non-U.S. institutions.

 

 

Centers for AIDS Research:D-CFAR, CFAR (P30, NIH)
Request For Applications (RFA) Number: PAR-09-103
Submission Dates:

Release Date: February 13, 2009
Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): May 15, 2009; May 14, 2010; May 16, 2011
Application Submission Date(s): June 15, 2009; June 15, 2010; June 15, 2011
Peer Review Date(s): September 2009; September, 2010; September, 2011
Council Review Date(s): October 2009; October 2010; October 2011
Earliest Anticipated Start Date(s): March, 2010; March, 2011; March, 2012
Additional Information To Be Available Date (Url Activation Date): Not Applicable
Expiration Date: June 16, 2011

 

 

Executive Summary

  • Purpose. This FOA solicits applications for the Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) program to provide administrative and shared research support to enhance HIV/AIDS research. Applications are being solicited for both standard CFARs and developmental CFARs (D-CFARs). Standard and D-CFARs provide core facilities, expertise, resources, and services not readily obtained otherwise through more traditional funding mechanisms. Additionally, D-CFARs provide support to assist investigators in the development of a competitive standard CFAR. The program emphasizes interdisciplinary collaboration, especially between basic and clinical investigators, translational research between the laboratory and the clinic and vice versa, inclusion of minority investigators, and inclusion of prevention and behavioral change research.
  • Mechanism of Support. This FOA will utilize the NIH Center Core Grants (P30) assistance mechanism.
  • Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards. The number of awards will vary from year to year dependent on the funds available, the quality of the applications received, and programmatic priorities.
  • Budget and Project Period. An applicant may request a project period of up to 5 years. For D-CFAR applications, up to $750,000 total costs per center per year will be awarded. For standard CFAR applications, up to $3M total costs per center per year will be awarded. The total amount awarded will depend on the applicant institutions’ NIH AIDS-funded research base.
  • Eligible Institutions/Organizations. Institutions/organizations listed in Section III, 1.A.are eligible to apply.
  • Eligible Project Directors/Principal Investigators (PDs/PIs). Individuals with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research are invited to work with their institution/organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.
  • Number of PDs/PIs. Only one PD/PI may be designated on the application.
  • Number of Applications. The NIH will not consider more than one application simultaneously from an applicant organization. Furthermore, no institution may hold more than one CFAR award.
  • Resubmissions. Resubmissions will be accepted for both standard CFAR and D-CFAR applications. Such applications must include an Introduction addressing the previous peer review critique (Summary Statement). See new NIH policy on resubmission (amended) applications (NOT-OD-09-003, NOT-OD-09-016).
  • Renewals. Applicants for standard CFARs may submit a renewal application. Renewals are not permitted for D-CFARs.
  • Hearing Impaired. Telecommunications for the hearing impaired are available at: TTY 301-451-5936

 

 

 

Recovery Act Limited Competition: NIH Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research (RC1, NIH)

 

Request For Applications (RFA) Number: RFA-OD-09-003

Key Dates 
Release/Posted Date: March 4, 2009
Opening Date: March 27, 2009 (Earliest date an application may be submitted to Grants.gov)
Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): Not applicable
NOTE: On-time submission requires that applications be successfully submitted to Grants.gov no later than 5:00 p.m. local time (of the applicant institution/organization).
Application Due Date(s): April 27, 2009
Peer Review Date(s): June/July 2009
Council Review Date(s): August 2009
Earliest Anticipated Start Date(s): September 30, 2009
Additional Information To Be Available Date (Activation Date): Not Applicable
Expiration Date: April 28, 2009


Executive Summary

NIH has received new funds for Fiscal Years (FYs) 2009 and 2010 as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). NIH has designated at least $200 million for a new initiative called the NIH Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research (see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/challenge_award/). This new program will support research on topic areas which address specific scientific and health research challenges in biomedical and behavioral research that would benefit from significant 2-year jumpstart funds. NIH Institute and Centers have selected specific Challenge Topics within each of the Challenge Areas. The research in these Challenge Areas should have a high impact in biomedical or behavioral science and/or public health.

  • Purpose. As part of the Recovery Act, the NIH invites, through this limited competition, NIH Challenge Grant (RC1) applications from domestic (United States) institutions/organizations proposing novel research in areas that address specific knowledge gaps, scientific opportunities, new technologies, data generation, or research methods that would benefit from an influx of funds to quickly advance the area in significant ways. This program is designed to support research in scientific areas identified by the Institutes and Centers, as described below.
  • Mechanism of Support. This FOA will utilize the NIH Challenge Grant (RC1) award mechanism.
  • Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards. This initiative is funded under the Recovery Act. NIH has designated at least $200 million in FYs 2009 - 2010 to fund 200 or more grants, contingent upon the submission of a sufficient number of scientifically meritorious applications. In addition, Recovery Act funds allocated to NIH specifically for comparative effectiveness research (CER) may be available to support additional grants. Projects receiving these funds will need to meet this definition of CER: “a rigorous evaluation of the impact of different options that are available for treating a given medical condition for a particular set of patients. Such a study may compare similar treatments, such as competing drugs, or it may analyze very different approaches, such as surgery and drug therapy.” Such research may include the development and use of clinical registries, clinical data networks, and other forms of electronic health data that can be used to generate or obtain outcomes data as they apply to CER.
  • Budget and Project Period. Budget requests should be commensurate with project needs up to a two-year project period. The requested budget may not exceed $500,000 total costs per year for a maximum of $1,000,000 total costs over a two-year project period.
  • Page Limits: The Research Plan is limited to 12 pages
  • Eligible Institutions/Organizations. Institutions/organizations listed in Section III, 1.A.are eligible to apply. Foreign institutions/organizations are not eligible to apply.
  • Eligible Project Directors/Principal Investigators (PDs/PIs). Individuals with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research are invited to work with their institution/ organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.
  • Early Stage Investigators (ESIs)/New Investigators (New PIs). New PIs and Early Stage Investigators (ESIs) are invited to apply for Recovery Act Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research. Because the awards made under this program are substantial competing NIH research grants, recipients will not be considered New PIs or ESIs when they apply for NIH research grants in the future. More information can be found at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/new_investigators/index.htm.
  • Application Materials. See Section IV.1for application materials.
  • General Information. For general information on SF424 (R&R) Application and Electronic Submission, see these Web sites:
  • Hearing Impaired. Telecommunications for the hearing impaired are available at: TTY: (301) 451-5936

 


 

ARTICLES OF INTEREST AND OTHER UPDATES

 

NIH NCI Fellowship Opportunities in Technology Transfer

The DHHS, NIH, NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) has fellowship opportunities available to qualified candidates in one of the fastest growing fields, technology transfer. These fellowship opportunities let you combine your science background with a new career in the technology transfer field. Candidates must possess an advanced degree in the sciences and/or a law degree.

The TTC is responsible for negotiating agreements and promoting research partnerships between NCI scientists and outside parties such as universities and biotechnology/ pharmaceutical companies. These research partnerships allow for federally funded research findings to be further developed and commercialized.

Candidate will be responsible for:

  • Drafting and negotiating Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) for NCI scientists and their industrial/academic research partners;
  • Planning and negotiating Material Transfer Agreements, Clinical Trial Agreements and other technology transfer agreements;
  • Development of technology transfer educational programs for scientists;
  • Overseeing patent related issues for NCI scientists;
  • Other duties as pertaining to intellectual property and technology transfer.

Stipends are determined by the level of education and number of years of experience post-graduation. Starting stipends for those with no experience are : Master’s degree $31,700, Ph.D. or J.D. $45,300. Starting stipends are higher if candidate has relevant work experience and/or additional, applicable degrees. Stipends are paid monthly in arrears. Annual stipend increases may be given on the Fellow’s anniversary date and health benefits are provided. Candidate must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident (must hold green card) eligible for citizenship within 4 years. Candidate must have received most current degree within the last 8 years. To apply: Submit a copy of your resume or CV and a statement of interest explaining why you are interested in the TTC fellowship program. Also, include two letters of recommendation. Fax: Attention: TTC Fellowship Coordinator (fax# 301-402-2117) or mail to Technology Transfer Center National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Blvd., Suite 450, Rockville, MD 20852, ATTN: TTC Fellowship Coordinator. Email: Karen Griffin (kg6q@nih.gov).

Applications are accepted year round. The DHHS/NIH/NCI are Equal Opportunity Employers.

More information is available at http://felcom.od.nih.gov/.

Previously Spotlighted Minority Microbiology Scientist, Erle Robertson, Elected AAM Fellow

The Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities congratulates Erle Robertson, Ph.D., who was recently elected Fellow in the American Academy of Microbiology. Dr. Robertson is Professor in the Department of Microbiology at The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and his research focuses on the mechanisms of oncogenesis by herpes viruses. He is a member of ASM, the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and the American Society of Virology, and his work was featured in The Minority Microbiology Mentor in December 2008 (Vol. 3, No. 12).

ASCB Funding Opportunities for Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) Minorities Affairs Committee's Visiting Professors program funds collaborations between ASCB members and faculty from Minority-Serving Institutions, regardless of ethnicity. These awards of $17,400 defray salary and other expenses related to the Visiting Professor spending at least eight weeks in the summer in the laboratory of an ASCB member investigator, and maintaining the collaboration during the academic year. Individuals who are members of underrepresented minorities in the sciences at research intensive institutions, especially at junior faculty levels, are also encouraged to apply.

 

A second program funds Linkage Fellows up to $8,000 per year to facilitate activities that promote careers and research in cell biology at Minority-Serving Institutions. Activities could include seminars, symposia, travel, and other research-related activities, based on the identified needs and strategy outlined in the application. Both programs are funded by a grant from the Minorities Access to Research Careers (MARC) Program from NIGMS.

 

If you would like to be a Host Scientist, Visiting Professor, or Linkage Fellow, further information is available on the ASCB MAC website <http://app.streamsend.com/c/2740112/8282/2QS4IR9/908u?redirect_to=http%3A%2F%2Fascb.org%2Findex.php%3Foption%3Dcom_content%26amp%3Bview%3Darticle%26amp%3Bid%3D89%26amp%3BItemid%3D6.>

 

The deadline for applications for both programs is March 31, 2009. Please consider sharing this information with your colleagues. If you have any questions, please contact Deborah McCall, Senior Manager, Minorities Affairs, by email at dmccall@ascb.org.

 

FDA Commissioner's Fellowship

 

The FDA has now started accepting applications for the second class of the FDA Commissioner's Fellowship Program. The fellowship program combines rigorous didactic coursework with the development of a hypothesis-driven, regulatory science research project. The application deadline is April 15th and the 2-year program start date will be October 5th.

Applicants must be U.S. Citizens, non-citizen nationals of the U.S., or have been admitted to the U.S. for permanent residence before the program start date. More information is available at http://www.fda.gov/commissionersfellowships/default.htm.

 

NSF Releases Report on Underrepresented Groups in Science

The National Science Foundation has released the latest issue of Women, Minorities and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering, a report mandated by law and providing statistical data on the status of those groups to Congress and federal agency heads in January of odd-numbered years. Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering is a report that provides information about the participation of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering education and employment. Information on the site is organized by topic and group. Links to additional data sources and reports are provided.

Congressional briefing, "Building a Diverse Scientific Workforce: Collaboration for a Competitive and Healthy Nation," to be co-sponsored by ASM CMIIM

A congressional briefing, titled "Building a Diverse Scientific Workforce: Collaboration for a Competitive and Healthy Nation" will be held on March 12, 2009 at the Rayburn House Office Building. The United States is the world’s leader in science. Maintaining this status is considered to be a national priority. To do so will require the U.S. to respond to critical challenges, including addressing a shrinking “pipeline” of talented people interested in science, technology, and clinical careers. The challenge is to tap and develop all of the diverse talents that make up this country’s human capital. It is imperative to ensure that future generations of scientists fully engage the nation’s spectrum of racial and ethnic diversity so that all might contribute to and benefit from our scientific achievements. This briefing is co-sponsored by the ASM CMIIM.  

Immunologist/Viral Immunologist Position at Tunnell Consulting, Inc.

Tunnell Consulting, Inc. is a successful employee-owned company providing technical, organizational and operational consulting. Our highly-experienced professionals actively work to create a team-based approach to all client projects.We utilize this holistic approach to create innovative, integrated and differentiated solutions that add real value to our clients' operations. As a result, our commitment to our employees is as important as our commitment to our clients.Discover the Value Tunnell Consulting can add to your career. We have an exciting full time Immunologist opportunity available located in Bethesda Maryland.

A creative scientist is sought for a highly visible position. This position will be responsible for coordinating immunological research, and researchcollaborations with other departments/laboratories through correspondence; as well as reagent acquisition. The scientist should have expertise in cell mediated immune responses to viral infections. This person will manage research projects that they have principal responsibility for, as well as providing immunological support to other projects in the form of consultative subject matter expertise and/or direct research.

Desired research experience includes:

  • Ph.D. in Immunology
  • Post-doctoral/industrial experience in one or more areas:
  • Immune response in non-human primates
  • Viral pathogenesis
  • Immune response to Category A microorganisms such as:
  • Pox viruses or DNA viruses
  • Viral hemorrhagic fever viruses or RNA viruses
  • Innovative approaches to viral vaccines
  • Development of animal models
  • Classical (both T & B cell) and novel immunological approaches
  • BSL3 or BSL4 facilities experience
  • Good peer reviewed publication record

To learn more or to apply to this position please email Rosemary Menna, Human Resources at menna@tunnellconsulting.com or to apply online, please visit our career site at http://www.tunnellconsulting.com/.

Technical Sales Consultant Position at Miltenyi Biotec, Inc

Miltenyi Biotec Inc., a global leader in biological magnetic cell separation science, is seeking a Technical Sales Consultant based out of Boston, MA to service a northeastern territory that includes Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine. This position is responsible for developing sales and servicing existing accounts through in-depth product line knowledge.

Responsibilities:

· Meet and/or exceed company sales forecasts in designated territory through in-depth knowledge of market segments, expert technical sales knowledge across product line, and sales skills to convert customer leads to sales

· Identify potential sales leads and develop sales plan for converting leads to sales using available resources (targeted marketing, science, customer care, clinical & molecular representatives, etc)

· Travel (80% local) throughout assigned territory to call on regular and prospective customers to developand maintain knowledge of accounts, solicit orders, perform product demonstrations/seminars, attend trade shows, and perform troubleshooting

· Develops strong customer relationships to enhance and maintain current and future business with Miltenyi Biotec Inc.

· Research, troubleshoot and follow through to a prompt solution with any customer question, problem, or complaint

· Accountable for maintaining customer and sales information in assigned territory

· Participate in strategic market analysis to define potential opportunity for maximizing territory sales

· Identify competitive and market trend information to assist in defining new product opportunities and special marketing programs

· Work collaboratively in shared accounts to grow the sales of the company overall

Requirements: Ph.D., M.S. or B.S. degree from a four-year college or university and two to four years experience in the life sciences environment; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Biology degree is preferred, and Ph.D. is highly desirable.

Other Requirements: Must possess a valid driver’s license, evidence of insurance / insurability and ability to receive appropriate clearance to access restricted government accounts.

We offer a competitive salary, commission, car allowance, and excellent benefits package. There is no relocation associated with this position. EOE/AA

To apply go to: https://home.eease.com/recruit/?id=174407

HIV Virologist Position at RAPID Laboratories

RAPID Laboratories has aposition for anHIV virologist to conduct studies on small molecule peptide entry inhibitors and development of an anti-HIV therapeutics and vaccine as part of a small group working in a start-up biotechnology business.

Ideal applicants should have a BA/BS/MA/MS equivalent degree; a record of research accomplishment and willingness to undertake diverse tasks in support of the research of the company. HIV experience is a must. RAPID Laboratories are looking for a highly motivated and innovative virologist, who is meticulous, well-organized, a self-starter and team player to join our research group. The successful candidate will be primarily responsible for immunological, biochemical and cell-based assays to characterize antiviral therapies and vaccines.

- 5+ years experience in HIV research in academic, pharmaceutical or biotech industry with comprehensive knowledge of HIV biology, pathogenesis and drug discovery

- must have demonstrated experience in HIV with a proven track record of high quality scientific publications

- strong understanding of ISO, GMP and GLP standards a plus

- attention to detail and ability to keep detailed written records essential.

- requires strong written and verbal communication skills.

- bachelor or masters degree or equivalent experience in Virology / Immunology

Must already be U S citizen of have current green card.

The position will be located in the Rockville, MD area. Salary will be commensurate with experience and applicants should send a cover letter and C.V. to:

J. B O’Neill
Director of Health Science Administration
RAPID Pharmaceuticals, Inc
boneill@rapidpharma.com

 

SPOTLIGHT ON MINORITY MICROBIOLOGY SCIENTISTS

 

Dale Lewis, Ph.D., Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

The galactose (gal) operon of E. coli, which consists of four structural genes (galETKM), is transcribed from two overlapping promoters, P1 and P2, separated by 5-bp. The gene products are needed for the metabolism of galactose and cell wall synthesis. In a recent paper (J. Mol Biol, 382(4):843-58, Lewis et al. 2008), Dr. Dale Lewis and colleagues at NIH investigated why elongating RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the gal operon overrides DNA-bound galactose repressor (GalR) located at OI in galE because in the lactose (lac) operon, an internal operator (O2) when bound by lac repressor (LacI) is known to block RNAP. They found that a stretch of purine residues (GAGAG) in the RNA:DNA hybrid of the gal operon located 12-bp upstream of OI acts as an anti-pause element preventing RNAP backtracking and promoting forward translocation of RNAP. However, when a 5-bp sequence was inserted between this purine sequence and OI, RNAP paused and backtracked by 4-7 nt and DNA-bound GalR blocked about 60% of the gal transcripts from both promoters. This block is sensitive to Gre factors, D-galactose and antisense nucleotides. This study explains another way to regulate galactose metabolism that was previously unknown. It also gives importance to the DNA sequence located immediately upstream OI, which plays an important role in the synthesis of the genes' products.

Dr. Lewis graduated from Bronx Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY) in 1986 with an A.A.S degree in Medical Laboratory Technology. As a participant in the Minority Biomedical Research Support (MBRS) program, he worked with Dr. Richard F. Heller studying "The Effect of Nitrogen Dioxide on Lung in Hamsters". In 1989, he graduated with Cum Laude honors at the City College of CUNY with a B.S. degree in Biochemistry. As a member of the Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) program, he worked with Dr. Horst Schulz studying "The Identification of Fatty Acid Binding Protein in Bovine Adrenal Glands, Rat Spleens and Pancreas". As a Predoctoral MARC Fellow, he received a M.S in 1992 and a Ph.D. in 1995 in Molecular Biology from Princeton University. He worked with Dr. Jannette Carey studying "The Interactions of Tryptophan Repressor with its DNA Operators". At the National Institutes of Health (NIH), he has worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow, a Research Fellow and a Staff Scientist (at present) with Dr. Sankar Adhya since 1995 studying "Transcriptional Regulation of the Lactose and Galactose Operons in E. coli and the Role of Bacteriophage lambda Operators in the Regulation of its Lysogenic Promoter (PRM) and Lytic Promoters (PL and PR).

 

 

 


 

In July 2006, the Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities (CMIIM) of the American Society for Microbiology Public and Scientific Affairs Board developed a monthly e-newsletter which contains information pertinent to minority microbiologists. Currently, there are very few minority-based newsletters for scientists, and there are none for microbiologists.

 

This e-newsletter provides a central means of distributing pertinent information to underrepresented minorities in the field of microbiology. Some examples include career advice, networking tips, relevant news articles, unique funding and career opportunities, microbiological issues affecting minorities (e.g., HIV), minority issues affecting microbiologists (e.g., minority retention), and scientific articles published by minorities or by minority-serving institutions (MSIs).

 

The target populations are African-Americans, Latino-Americans, Native Americans, Alaska natives, and Pacific Islanders; however, all ASM members are invited to sign up and to share this information with others who may find this e-newsletter beneficial.

 

Signing up to receive The Minority Microbiology Mentor is very easy and is open to ASM members and non-members: simply go to http://www.asm.org/subscribe.asp, enter your email address, and select "MinorityMicroMentor" then submit, and you will receive confirmation of your subscription by email. If you are an ASM member, you will be prompted to Log In before signing up.

 

The Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities is chaired by Marian Johnson-Thompson, Ph.D., recently retired Director of Education and Biomedical Research Development at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, in Research Triangle Park, NC.The Minority Microbiology Mentor Editor-in-Chief is Crystal N. Johnson, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, MS, and the Associate Editor is Dwayne W. Boucaud, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Quinnipiac University Department of Biomedical Sciences in Hamden, CT.

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