Studies of Gut Flora in Infants and Toddlers Could Lead to Better Health

WASHINGTON, DC – March 20, 2014 – Breastfeeding until at least nine months of age increases prevalence in the gastrointestinal tract of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria, species which are known to contribute to development of a healthy immune system, according to a paper describing the establishment of the intestinal microbiota during the first three years of life. The research was published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

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Study Fingers Chickens, Quail, in Spread of H7N9 Influenza Virus

WASHINGTON, DC – March 18, 2014 – Among the copious species of poultry in China, quail and chickens are the likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans, according to a paper published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology.

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Seminal Fluid Increases Gonorrhea Infectivity

WASHINGTON, DC – March 4, 2014 – Researchers have come a step closer to understanding how gonorrhea infections are transmitted. When Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacteria responsible for gonorrhea, are exposed to seminal plasma, the liquid part of semen containing secretions from the male genital tract, they can more easily move and start to colonize. The research, led by investigators at Northwestern University in Chicago, appears in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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Bacterium and Fungus Team Up to Cause Virulent Tooth Decay in Toddlers

WASHINGTON, DC – March 12, 2014 – Early childhood caries, a highly aggressive and painful form of tooth decay that frequently occurs in preschool children, especially from backgrounds of poverty, may result from a nefarious partnership between a bacterium and a fungus, according to a paper published ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity.

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Fossilized Human Feces from 14th Century Contain Antibiotic Resistance Genes

WASHINGTON, DC – February 27, 2014 – A team of French investigators has discovered viruses containing genes for antibiotic resistance in a fossilized fecal sample from 14th century Belgium, long before antibiotics were used in medicine. They publish their findings ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

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