ASM Journals

The mission of the ASM Journals program is to advance the microbiological sciences through the pursuit of scientific knowledge and dissemination of the results of fundamental and applied research. Edited by working scientists who are drawn from eminent institutions around the world, ASM Journals have delivered excellence and value for nearly 100 years. Known for their quality, rigor, and fairness, ASM Journals continue to provide current, influential coverage of basic and clinical microbial research.

To create more opportunities for researchers to get their important findings out to the global scientific community and share insights across subfields, ASM is launching two new interdisciplinary open-access journals, mSphereTM and mSystemsTM, in early 2016. mSphereTM will be led by Founding Editor in Chief Michael Imperiale, who seeks to publish high-quality work that makes fundamental contributions to our understanding of the broad field of microbiology. Jack Gilbert will serve as the Founding Editor in Chief of mSystemsTM, which will welcome submissions from researchers who focus on the microbiome, genomics, metagenomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, glycomics, bioinformatics, and computational microbiology. Both mSphere and mSystems™ will provide streamlined decisions, while carrying on ASM’s tradition for rigorous peer review. Calls for Papers are scheduled for September 2015. For more information, please visit: http://msphere.asm.org/ and http://msystems.asm.org/.

Thomson Reuters reports the following data on ASM’s journals in its most recent Journal Citation Reports®:

  • ASM journals publish 20% of all Microbiology articles, while accounting for 33% of all Microbiology citations
  • ASM publishes 4 journals in the Top 20 of Microbiology ranked by Impact Factor
  • ASM journals publish the 5 highest-cited journals in Microbiology
  • ASM journals publish the #1 journal ranked by Eigenfactor® in 2 fields
  • ASM has the top-cited journal in 4 categories

Articles published in the ASM journals receive international media attention and have been featured in the New York Times, Science Magazine, Los Angeles Times, CNN, National Public Radio (NPR), CNBC, and dozens of other media outlets.

What's New in Journals?

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Potentially Life-Threatening Fungus Found In Water Distribution Systems of Five French Hospitals

Washington, DC – September 23, 2016 - A specific strain of the fungus, Fusarium oxysporum, circulates in the water distribution systems of five French hospitals, in two widely separated cities. This microbe is potentially a life-threatening risk to immunocompromised patients. The research is published September 23, 2016 in Applied and...

09-23-2016

β-lactamase Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Found In Marine Pathogen

Washington, DC – September 19, 2016 – A team of Chinese investigators has discovered a gene for resistance to β-lactamase antibiotics, in the pathogenic marine bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The β-lactamase gene, blaVEB-2, has never before been found in V. parahaemolyticus, and in fact, has been found almost exclusively in non-marine...

09-19-2016

Protein Synthesis, ATP Unnecessary for Bacterial Spore Germination

Washington, DC - September 19, 2016 - Spores of Bacillus bacteria can survive for years in a dormant state, and then germinate in minutes. But it has long been unclear whether germination required protein synthesis, or cellular energy packets, which are known as ATP. Now, a team from UConn Health,...

09-19-2016

Microbes Corrode Steel in Ships, Marine Infrastructure

Washington, DC - September 16, 2016 - Rust is the bane of steel, whether on cars, on ships and boats, or as part of marine infrastructure. Now, contrary to previous thinking, it turns out that the ocean-dwelling, steel-corroding species, Mariprofundus sp. DIS-1, can thrive under aerobic conditions, rather than being...

09-16-2016

Chinese Investigators Characterize the World of Resistance Gene Exchange Among Bacteria

Washington, DC – September 9, 2016 – Certain antibiotic resistance genes are easily transferred from one bacterial species to another, and can move between farm animals and the human gut. A team led by Chinese researchers has characterized this “mobile resistome,” which they say is largely to blame for the...

09-09-2016

Molecules Released by Klebsiella pneumoniae Bacterium Pave the Way for Invasive Infection

Washington, DC – September 13, 2016 – It’s been known that the bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae secretes small molecules called siderophores that enable it to acquire iron from a host and fuel its spread. Now, Michigan researchers have found that these molecules play additional roles in helping the organism invade. Their...

09-08-2016

Fungi Contribute to Delayed Healing of Chronic Wounds

Washington, DC – September 6, 2016 – Researchers in Pennsylvania and Iowa have discovered that fungal communities found in chronic wounds can form mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms and can be associated with poor outcomes and longer healing times. Their report, the first deep characterization of the fungi found in diabetic foot...

09-06-2016

Zika Reference Strain Sequenced--Will Aid in Diagnosis, Screening

Washington, DC - September 1, 2016 - An international team of researchers has sequenced a strain of the Zika virus that will be used as a World Health Organization (WHO) reference strain to identify Zika virus infection in the blood, thus making it easier to diagnose the disease. While the...

09-01-2016

ICU Patients Lose Helpful Gut Bacteria within Days of Hospital Admission

Washington, DC – August 31, 2016 – The microbiome of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at a hospital differs dramatically from that of healthy patients, according to a new study published in mSphere. Researchers analyzing microbial taxa in ICU patients' guts, mouth and skin reported finding dysbiosis,...

08-31-2016

Researchers Identify Multidrug-resistant E. coli Bacteria from New Jersey Patient

Washington, DC – August 29, 2016 – New Jersey researchers have identified what is believed to be the first strain of Escherichia coli bacteria from a patient in the United States that harbored two mobile genes making it resistant to both broad spectrum carbapenem antibiotics as well as colistin, an...

08-30-2016

 

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