ASM Weekly Newsdigest #613


  1. Chemical treatment for colony collapse disorder temporarily worsens viral infections in honeybees
  2. 'Totally' Resistant TB Surfaces in India
  3. Key Protein May Give Ebola Virus Its Opening
  4. From the Jungle to J.F.K., Viruses Cross Borders in Monkey Meat
  5. Gut bacteria ‘biome’ differs in obese people
  6. New Analysis Challenges Tamiflu Efficacy
  7. Antibiotics Breed Drug Resisant Bacteria in Pigs
  8. Bacteria's Move from Sea to Land May Have Occurred Much Later Than Thought
  9. The microbiome and disease: Gut bacteria influence the severity of heart attacks in rats
  10. A Tale of Two Viruses
  11. Quantitative imaging application to gut and ear cells


Chemical treatment for colony collapse disorder temporarily worsens viral infections in honeybees
PhysOrg
January 20, 2012
http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-01-chemical-treatment-colony-collapse-disorder.html
Acaricide, a chemical used against Varroa mites that infect honeybees, appears to render bees more susceptible to deformed wing virus infections, according to research published in the January issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.


'Totally' Resistant TB Surfaces in India
MedPageToday
January 17, 2012
http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/Tuberculosis/30710
In a letter to Clinical Infectious Diseases, published online, Mumbai physicians described four patients whose TB was resistant to five front-line drugs and seven second-line medications.


Key Protein May Give Ebola Virus Its Opening
New York Times
January 16, 2012
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/17/health/npc1-protein-may-give-ebola-its-opening.html?_r=1
The Hypothesis: Ebola infection can be prevented by manipulating a common cellular protein.


From the Jungle to J.F.K., Viruses Cross Borders in Monkey Meat
New York Times
January 13, 2012
http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/13/from-the-jungle-to-j-f-k-viruses-cross-borders-in-monkey-meat/
It’s a familiar story: deep within the jungle, an intrepid explorer or hunter awakens something he shouldn’t have. Maybe he bagged the wrong bat or came into contact with an ailing chimp. Whatever the origin, he unsuspectingly becomes host to something deadly and unseen and unwittingly carries it back home across the river or the ocean. And then the pandemic begins.


Gut bacteria ‘biome’ differs in obese people
Futurity
January 16, 2012
http://www.futurity.org/health-medicine/gut-bacteria-biome-differs-in-obese-people/
Researchers know that obese and lean people have differences in their gut microbiome, but a comprehensive, system-level understanding of how these variations affect energy production, use, and storage, remains unclear.


New Analysis Challenges Tamiflu Efficacy
MedPageToday
January 17, 2012
http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/URItheFlu/30727
A new review of the influenza drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu) has raised questions about both the efficacy of the medication and the commitment of its maker to supply enough data for claims about the drug to be evaluated by independent experts.


Antibiotics Breed Drug Resisant Bacteria in Pigs
Discovery
January 16, 2012
http://news.discovery.com/animals/antibiotics-drug-resistant-bacteria-pigs-farming-120116.html
After being exposed to antibiotics for only 2 weeks, a drastic rise in drug-resistant E. coli has been detected in guts of pigs.


Bacteria's Move from Sea to Land May Have Occurred Much Later Than Thought
ScienceDaily
December 22, 2011
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/12/111222195017.htm
Research by University of Tennessee, Knoxville, faculty has discovered that bacteria's move from sea to land may have occurred much later than thought. It also has revealed that the bacteria may be especially useful in bioenergy research.


The microbiome and disease: Gut bacteria influence the severity of heart attacks in rats
MedicalXpress
January 13, 2012
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-01-microbiome-disease-gut-bacteria-severity.html
New research suggests that the types and levels of bacteria in the intestines may be used to predict a person's likelihood of having a heart attack, and that manipulating these organisms may help reduce heart attack risk.


A Tale of Two Viruses
Discover
January 12, 2012
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2012/01/12/hiv-in-xmrv-out-how-scientists-deduce-what-does-and-doesnt-cause-a-disease/
Why AIDS was pinned to HIV, but chronic fatigue remains a mystery.


Quantitative imaging application to gut and ear cells
MedicalXpress
January 15, 2012
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-01-quantitative-imaging-application-gut-ear.html
From tracking activities within bacteria to creating images of molecules that make up human hair, several experiments have already demonstrated the unique abilities of the revolutionary imaging technique called multi-isotope imaging mass spectometry, or MIMS.


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