Welcome to the ASM Newsroom, a resource for journalists seeking information relating to the microbiological sciences.  Members of the media and the general public can access current and archived press releases from the Society as well as tipsheets highlighting the latest research published in our journals or presented at our meetings.

News Media Contacts:

Garth Hogan
Media Relations Coordinator
communications@asmusa.org

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Commensal bacteria were critical shapers of early human populations

WASHINGTON, DC - December 16, 2014 – Using mathematical modeling, researchers at New York and Vanderbilt universities have shown that commensal bacteria that cause problems later in life most likely played a key role in stabilizing early human populations.

12-16-2014

Enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide are closely related

WASHINGTON, DC - November 13, 2014 -- The strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that infect adults and children in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, have notably similar toxins and virulence factors, according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology. That bodes well for vaccine development, says corresponding author...

11-20-2014

Engineered for Tolerance, Bacteria Pump Out Higher Quantity of Renewable Gasoline

WASHINGTON, DC—November 4, 2014—An international team of bioengineers has boosted the ability of bacteria to produce isopentenol, a compound with desirable gasoline properties. The finding, published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, is a significant step toward developing a bacterial strain that can yield...

11-06-2014

Ebola, Marburg Viruses Edit Genetic Material During Infection

WASHINGTON, DC – November 4, 2014 – Filoviruses like Ebola “edit” genetic material as they invade their hosts, according to a study published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The work, by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,...

11-04-2014

Study Suggests Altering Gut Bacteria Might Mitigate Lupus

WASHINGTON, DC – October 20, 2014 -- Lactobacillus species, commonly seen in yogurt cultures, correlate, in the guts of mouse models, with mitigation of lupus symptoms, while Lachnospiraceae, a type of Clostridia, correlate with worsening, according to research published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. "Our results suggest that the same investigation shold...

10-24-2014

Versatile Antibiotic Found With Self-Immunity Gene On Plasmid In Staph Strain

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 13, 2014 - A robust, broad spectrum antibiotic, and a gene that confers immunity to that antibiotic are both found in the bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain 115. The antibiotic, a member of the thiopeptide family of antibiotics, is not in widespread use, partly due to its...

10-13-2014

Plants Prepackage Beneficial Microbes in Their Seeds

WASHINGTON, DC – September 29, 2014 -- Plants have a symbiotic relationship with certain bacteria. These ‘commensal’ bacteria help the pants extract nutrients and defend against invaders – an important step in preventing pathogens from contaminating fruits and vegetables. Now, scientists have discovered that plants may package their commensal bacteria inside...

09-29-2014

Sweat-Eating Bacteria May Improve Skin Health

WASHINGTON, DC – September 29, 2014 – Bacteria that metabolize ammonia, a major component of sweat, may improve skin health and some day could be used for the treatment of skin disorders, such as acne or chronic wounds. In a study conducted by AOBiome LLC, human volunteers using the bacteria reported...

09-29-2014

Critically Ill ICU Patients Lose Almost All of Their Gut Microbes—And The Ones Left Aren’t The Good Guys

WASHINGTON, DC—September 23, 2014—Researchers at the University of Chicago have shown that after a long stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) only a handful of pathogenic microbe species remain behind in patients’ intestines. The team tested these remaining pathogens and discovered that some can become deadly when provoked by...

09-23-2014

Influenza A Potentiates Pneumococcal Co-Infection: New Details Emerge

WASHINGTON, DC – September 22, 2014 – Influenza infection can enhance the ability of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause ear and throat infections, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity.

09-22-2014

What's New in Communications?

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Enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide are closely related

WASHINGTON, DC - November 13, 2014 -- The strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that infect adults and children in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, have notably similar toxins and virulence factors, according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology. That bodes well for vaccine development, says corresponding author...

11-20-2014

Versatile Antibiotic Found With Self-Immunity Gene On Plasmid In Staph Strain

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 13, 2014 - A robust, broad spectrum antibiotic, and a gene that confers immunity to that antibiotic are both found in the bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain 115. The antibiotic, a member of the thiopeptide family of antibiotics, is not in widespread use, partly due to its...

10-13-2014

American Society for Microbiology's Journals Score High in Latest Rankings

  WASHINGTON, DC – August 28, 2014 – The recently released 2013 Journal Citation Reports® confirm that the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) continues to be the authoritative source of high-impact research in microbiology. ASM publishes over 20% of all articles in the Microbiology category, while accounting for over 33% of all...

08-28-2014

ASM General Meeting and ICAAC Co-locate to Boston in 2016

WASHINGTON, DC – August 19, 2014 – The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) announces that starting in 2016 the Society will co-locate its two major annual meetings, the General Meeting and the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC).   The first co-located GM /ICAAC will be held June 2016 in...

08-19-2014

Report on Viruses Looks Beyond Disease

WASHINGTON, DC – July 22, 2014 – In contrast to their negative reputation as disease causing agents, some viruses can perform crucial biological and evolutionary functions that help to shape the world we live in today, according to a new report by the American Academy of Microbiology.

07-22-2014

Donohue Becomes President of the American Society for Microbiology

WASHINGTON, DC – July 1, 2014 – As of July 1, 2014, University of Wisconsin-Madison bacteriology professor Timothy J. Donohue will become president of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM).

07-01-2014

ASM and ISC Announce Joint ICAAC/ICC Meeting in 2015

WASHINGTON, DC – May 10, 2014 – The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and the International Society of Chemotherapy for Infection and Cancer (ISC) announce an agreement to hold the ASM's Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) and the ISC's International Congress of Chemotherapy (ICC) as a joint meeting...

05-09-2014

Rethink Education to Fuel Bioeconomy Says Report

WASHINGTON, DC – April 15, 2014 – Microbes can be highly efficient, versatile and sophisticated manufacturing tools, and have the potential to form the basis of a vibrant economic sector.  In order to take full advantage of the opportunity microbial-based industry can offer, though, educators need to rethink how future microbiologists...

04-15-2014

Intranasal Vaccine Protects Mice against West Nile Infection

WASHINGTON, DC – January 28, 2013 – Researchers from Duke University have developed a nasal vaccine formulation that provides protective immunity against West Nile virus (WNV) infection in mice after only 2 doses.  They present their findings at the 2014 American Society for Microbiology Biodefense and Emerging Diseases Research Meeting.

01-27-2014

Bacterial Toxin a Potential Trigger for Multiple Sclerosis

WASHINGTON, DC – January 28, 2014 –  Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College have added to the growing body of evidence that multiple sclerosis may be triggered by a toxin produced by common foodborne bacteria. The presented their research at the 2014 ASM Biodefense and Emerging Diseases Research Meeting.

01-27-2014

 

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