AMR Sept Banner v2

ASM Attends UN General Assembly

ASM President, Susan Sharp, Ph.D., joined global leaders at the United Nations General Assembly in New York today in a historical meeting to focus on the commitment to fight AMR.
Read

UN General Assembly Focuses on AMR

Leaders at the UN General Assembly draft a plan for coordinated, cross-cutting efforts to improve the current state of AMR.
Read

Superbugs are a 'Fundamental Threat'

If antibiotics were telephones, we would still be calling each other using clunky rotary dials and copper lines," Stefano Bertuzzi, CEO of ASM, told NBC News.
Read
Become a member today!
JOIN ASM
Submit Abstracts for Biothreats 2017
SUBMIT
Antibacterial Development Conference
REGISTER

Meltzer, Samuel J.

RETURN TO CHOMA HOME PAGE


Dates:
         b. 1851; 1885 to the US and NYC; 1904 to RIMR; d. 1920

Locations:    Practicing Physician, NYC (late 1890s); Physiologist and Member, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research (1904‑1920)

Training:      MD in Germany under Helmholtz, Du Bois‑Reymond, and Hugo Kronecker

Fields:        medical

Publications:

SAB Involvement:  Charter SAB member (present 1900, 1902 meetings); resigned SAB 1917; Founder of NY Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine; Founder of Society for Clinical Investigation

Archives Files:   Nat. Cyc. American Biog. 15, 1916; DSB

 

Notes: 

     Meltzer was over 50 when appointed to the RIMR.  He was trained initially as a physiologist, and was appointed the first of that title.  He was trained in Germany, and left the country because of his being a Jew.  He was, according to Corner the epitome of the effort to combine laboratory work and medical practice.  His Soc. for Clin. Invest. was called the Young Terms.  Meltzer studied the effect of adrenaline.  He also had an odd notion of "factors of safety" or the general biological law of adaptation of the organism to environmental stress. 

     At the 1900 meeting of the SAB, he presented "A Few Experimental Data on Hypodermic Injections," which was discussed by Sedgwick and Park.  At the 1908 SAB meeting, Meltzer discussed the "Mechanical Destruction of Tetanus Toxin."    

 

RETURN TO CHOMA HOME PAGE

TPL_asm2013_SEARCH

863