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ASM Attends UN General Assembly

ASM President, Susan Sharp, Ph.D., joined global leaders at the United Nations General Assembly in New York today in a historical meeting to focus on the commitment to fight AMR.
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UN General Assembly Focuses on AMR

Leaders at the UN General Assembly draft a plan for coordinated, cross-cutting efforts to improve the current state of AMR.
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Superbugs are a 'Fundamental Threat'

If antibiotics were telephones, we would still be calling each other using clunky rotary dials and copper lines," Stefano Bertuzzi, CEO of ASM, told NBC News.
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Moore

(1903-1994).  Ruth Ella Moore was born in 1903 in Columbus, Ohio went on to become the first African American woman in the United States to earn a Ph.D. in the natural sciences.  She received her B.S. and M.A. degrees from Ohio State University in 1926 and 1927, respectively. Ruth Moore performed her dissertation studies on tuberculosis at Ohio State University and received her Ph.D. in Bacteriology in 1933. During her years in graduate school Ruth Moore worked as an instructor at Tennessee State College (now Tennessee State University) in Nashville.  Moore accepted a position at Howard University Medical College after earning her Ph.D. and worked her way to become Head of the Department of Bacteriology (1947-1958).   Moore continued to teach and perform research at Howard University until her retirement in 1973. Professor Moore's area of research focused on blood grouping and enteriobacteriaceae. Ruth Ella Moore died in 1994 at the age of 91 in Rockville, MD.

 

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