Division A

Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Division A is concerned with the discovery, mode of action, development and use of antimicrobial agents, and the mechanisms by which infective agents develop resistance to these compounds.

2013 Officers - all terms run from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013

Chair
Hanna M. Wexler
UCLA School of Medicine
Los Angeles, CA
hwexler@ucla.edu
310-268-3404

Chair-Elect
Jeffrey D. Alder
Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Montville, NJ
jeff-lisa-alder@hotmail.com

Councilor
Linda A. Miller
GLAXOSMITHKLINE
Collegeville, PA
linda.a.miller@gsk.com
610-917-6280

Division A is part of Divisional Group II - Pathogenesis and Host Response Mechanisms

Divisional Group Representative
Victor DiRita
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
vdirita@umich.edu


Join DivANet

Website

 

Division Officer Contact Information


 

 

Divisional Groups

Divisional Groups

Divisions in Group

Divisional Group Representative 

I - Diagnostic Microbiology and Epidemiology

 C, F, L, V, Y, AA

Ellen Jo Baron
Stanford University Medical Center
Palo Alto, CA 
ejbaron@stanford.edu
650-380-6430

II - Pathogenesis and Host Response Mechanisms

 A, B, D, E, G, U, Z

Peggy Cotter
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC
pcotter@med.unc.edu  

III - General and Applied Microbiology

 I, N, O, P, Q, R, W

Russell Hill
University of Maryland
Baltimore, MD
hill@umces.edu 

IV - Molecular Microbiology, Physiology and Virology

 H, J, K, M, S, T, X

Paul Babitzke
Pennsylvania State University
University Park, PA 
pxb28@psu.edu

 

 Divisions (Officer terms are from July 1, 2014 - June 30, 2015)

Division Chair Chair-Elect Councilor
A -
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Joyce Sutcliffe
Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals
Watertown, MA
jsutcliffe@tphase.com 
Gerry Wright
McMaster University
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
wrightge@mcmaster.ca 
Keith Klugman
Emory University 
Atlanta, GA 
kklugma@emory.edu 

B -
Microbial Pathogens
Renee M. Tsolis
University of California
Davis, CA
rmtsolis@ucdavis.edu 

H. (Hank) Steven Seifert
Northwestern University
Chicago, IL 
h-seifert@northwestern.edu 

Steven Blanke
University of Illinois
Urbana, IL 
sblanke@life.illinois.edu 


C -
Clinical Microbiology
David W. Craft
Penn State Hershey Medical Center
Hershey, PA
dcraft1@hmc.psu.edu  



Eileen Burd
Emory University Hospital
Atlanta, GA
eburd@emory.edu 



Susan Sharp
Kaiser Permanente, NW
Portland, OR
susan.e.sharp@kp.org  

D -
Microbe-Host Interactions
Nina Salama
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Ctr.
Seattle, WA
nsalama@fhcrc.org

Vanessa Sperandio
UT Southwestern Medical Ctr.
Dallas, TX
vanessa.sperandio@utsouthwestern.edu 

 

Olaf Schneewind
The University of Chicago
Chicago,IL
oschnee@bsd.uchicago.edu 
E -
Immunology
Kate Fitzgerald
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Worchester, MA
kate.fitzgerald@umassmed.edu 

John MacMicking
Boyer Center for Molecular Medicine
New Haven, CT
john.macmicking@yale.edu 

 

David Mosser
University of Maryland
College Park, MD
dmosser@umd.edu 

F -
Medical Mycology
Aaron Mitchell
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA
apm1@cmu.edu 

Marta Feldmesser
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Bronx, NY
marta.feldmesser@einstein.yu.edu 

 

Maurizio Del Poeta
Med University of South Carolina
Charleston, SC
maurizio.delpoeta@stonybrook.edu 


G -
Mycoplasmology
Meghan A. May
Towson University
Towson, MD
mmay3@une.edu 

Li Xiao
University of Alabama in Birmingham
Birmingham, AL
lixiao@uab.edu 


Chris Minion
Iowa State University
Ames, IA
fcminion@iastate.edu 

H -
Genetics and Molecular Biology
Christopher S. Hayes
MCDB
Santa Barbara, CA
chayes@lifesci.ucsb.edu  
Susan Lovett
Brandeis University
Waltham, MA
lovett@brandeis.edu 



Joseph Peters
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY
jep48@cornell.edu 

I -
General Microbiology
Karen Visick
Loyola University Medical Center
Maywood, IL
kvisick@lumc.edu  

Larry Halverson
Iowa State University
Ames, IA
larryh@iastate.edu

 

Eric V. Stabb
University of Georgia
Athens, GA
estabb@uga.edu 

J -
Cell and Structural Biology
Peter Chien
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Amherst, MA
pchien@biochem.umass.edu  


Elizabeth Wright
Emory University
Atlanta, GA
erwrigh@emory.edu 

Briana Burton
Harvard University
Somerville, MA
bburton@mcb.harvard.edu  
K -
Microbial Physiology and Metabolism
Jeffrey A. Gralnick
University of Minnesota
Saint Paul, MN
gralnick@umn.edu 
Anne K. Dunn
University of Oklahoma
Norman, OK
akdunn@ou.edu 



Jared Leadbetter
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena, CA
jleadbetter@caltech.edu 

L -
Healthcare Epidemiology
Daniel J. Morgan
University of Maryland School of Med
Baltimore, MD
dmorgan@epi.umaryland.edu 


Keith Kaye
Detroit Medical Center
Detroit, MI
kkaye@dmc.org 

Tom Talbot
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, TN
tom.talbot@vanderbilt.edu 
M -
Bacteriophage
Mark Young
Montana State University
Bozeman, MT
myoung@montana.edu 

Mya Breitbart
University of South Florida
Saint Petersburg, FL
mya@usf.edu  

Louise Temple
James Madison University
Harrisonburg, VA
templelm@jmu.edu 

 

N -
Microbial Ecology
Robert Sanford
University of Illinois
Urbana, IL 
rsanford@illinois.edu  

Barbara Campbell
Clemson University
Clemson, SC
bcampb7@clemson.edu 

 

K. Eric Wommack
University of Delaware
Newark, DE
wommack@dbi.udel.edu 
O -
Fermentation and Biotechnology
Steven D. Brown
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Oak Ridge, TN
brownsd@ornl.gov 
 
Aindrila Mukhopadhyay
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories
Berkeley, CA
amukhopadhyay@lbl.gov 

 
Badal Saha
USDA-ARS
Peoria, IL
badal.saha@ars.usda.gov 
P -
Food Microbiology
Omar A. Oyarzabal
Institute for Environmental Health, Inc.
Lake Forest Park, WA
oaoyarzabal@gmail.com 
 

Edward G. Dudley
Pennsylvania State University
University Park, PA
edg100@psu.edu 

 

Pina Fratamico
USDA-ARS
Wyndmoor, PA
pina.fratamico@ars.usda.gov 
Q -
Environmental and General Applied Microbiology
Chuanwu Xi
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
cxi@umich.edu  
Michael Sadowsky
University of Minnesota
St. Paul, MN
sadowsky@umn.edu 

Donna Fennell
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
New Brunswick, NJ
fennell@envsci.rutgers.edu 

 

R -
Evolutionary and Genomic Microbiology
Tim Cooper
University of Houston
Houston, TX
tfcooper@uh.edu 
John McCutcheon
University of Montana
Missoula, MT
john.mccutcheon@umontana.edu 


Jennifer Gardy
Briish Columbia Ctr. of Disease Control
Vancouver, BC, Canada
jennifer.gardy@bccdc.ca  

S -
DNA Viruses
Alison McBride
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD
amcbride@nih.gov 

Joel Baines
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY
jdb11@cornell.edu 


Katherine Spindler
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, MI
krspin@umich.edu 

T -
RNA Viruses
Erica Ollmann Saphire
The Scripps Research Institute
La Jolla, CA
erica@scripps.edu 



Kathleen Boris-Lawrie
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH
boris-lawrie.1@osu.edu 


Kim Y. Green
National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Disease
Bethesda, MD
kgreen@niaid.nih.gov  

U -
Mycobacteriology

Eric Rubin
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA
erubin@hsph.harvard.edu 

 

Andrea Cooper
Trudeau Institute
Saranac Lake, NY
acooper@trudeauinstitute.org 

 

Kathleen McDonough
David Axelrod Institute
Albany, NY
kathleen.mcdonough@wadsworth.org 
V -
Clinical and Molecular Diagnostic Immunology

Sandra Steiner
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Atlanta, GA 
ssteiner@cdc.gov 

 

Jon Heinrichs
Merck Research Labs
West Point, PA
jon.heinrichs94@verizon.net 

 

 

Nahed Ismail
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA
ismailn@upmc.edu 

W -
Microbiology Education
Jennifer Herzog
Herkimer County Community College
Herkimer, NY
herzogja@herkimer.edu 
Lee E. Hughes
University of North Texas
Denton, TX
lhughes@unt.edu 



Laurie Caslake
Lafayette College
Easton, PA
caslakel@lafayette.edu 

X -
Molecular, Cellular and General Biology of Eukaryotes
(William) Scott Moye- Rowley
University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA
scott-moye-rowley@uiowa.edu 


Judith Berman
Tel Aviv University
Rawat Aviv, Israel
jberman@post.tau.ac.il 
N. Louis Glass
UC-Berkeley
Berkeley, CA
lglass@berkeley.edu
Y -
Public Health
Susanne Zanto Norris
Montana Public Health Laboratory 
Helena, MT
szanto@mt.gov 

Kirsten St. George
New York State Department of Health
Albany, NY
kxs16@health.state.ny.us 

 

Joanne Bartkus
Minnesota Department of Health
Saint Paul, MN
joanne.bartkus@state.mn.us 

 

Z -
Animal Health Microbiology
Richard Isaacson
University of Minnesota
Saint Paul, MN
isaac015@umn.edu 

Tracy Nicholson
ARS, USDA
Ames, IA
tracy.nicholson@ars.usda.gov 

 

Paul Plummer
Iowa State University
Boone, IA 
pplummer@iastate.edu 

AA -
Free-Living, Symbiotic and Parasitic Protists
Marc-Jan Gubbels
Boston College
Chestnut Hill, MA 
gubbelsj@bc.edu 

Bobbi Pritt
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
pritt.bobbi@mayo.edu 

Gustavo Arrizabalaga
Indiana University School of Medicine
Bloomington, IN
garrizab@iupui.edu 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Division Resources and Training

General Meeting Information

2010 Division Officer Administrative Duties
Division Officers have many things to think about beyond the General Meeting. This short presentation will help guide you through your administrative duties and responsibilities.
2010 General Meeting Program Planning
Development of the Program for each General Meeting starts over a year in advance of the actual meeting. This presentation will provide you with the basics of how to do it.
2009 Abstract Reviews I - Duties
The Abstract Review Process is a critical part of your annual commitment to the General Meeting. This overview describes the responsibilities for all reviewers.
2009 Abstract Reviews II - Process
The discussion on the Abstract Review Process continues in this talk with a description of how the on-line review process works.

History of the General Meeting
If you are interested in looking at who has been a division chair or the division lecturer, the following downloads are the place to find them.

Division Chairs
This document contains a listing of all division Chairs since 1981.
Division Lecturers
This document contains a listing of all division lectures since 1981.
Divisional Group Symposia
The Divisional Group Symposia represent ideas of broad interest to the divisions within each group. This listing will give you the titles of these important sessions at the meeting.
ASM Lectures
The ASM Lecture is the keynote address for the General Meeting. This document provides a listing of who has been the ASM Lecturer (and the topic) since 1981.


Other Information

Division Web Page Development
Want to develop a web page for your division? This document provides you with some ideas on suggested content as well as ASM's policies relating to this important method of communication with your division membership.
Division Listservs
A listserve dedicated to the interests of your division is a convenient tool in the communication process. This document will help you create this service for your division.

 

 


Division Information

The scientific interests of the society's membership comprise the full spectrum of microbiology. Because of this, the society has been divided into divisions where each division represents scientists with similar scientific interests and research goals. Each division is also represented on the ASM Council that is tasked with governing the activities of the Society.

Upon registering with the Society, scientists or students may designate a Primary and Secondary Division for membership based on their individual interests. Establising Full Membership in their Primary Division includes the right to elect the Division Leadership (Councilor, Chair, and Chair-Elect). Membership in the Secondary Division ensures each scientist can be aware of changes in policy for that division as well as expand the network of scientists with like interests. The member cannot vote for the Division Leadership positions in his secondary division. A member can change division affiliations at any time by changing their Membership Profile found at "Change Your Password and More" under the Members Only Section of the landing page of this website.

Benefits of Participation

Participation in Division activities goes well beyond the informal network of scientists with similar scientific interests. Members can:

  1. Participate in the governance of the Society;
  2. Receive current information on the topic through newsletters, direct mail, and participate in on-line discussion groups;
  3. Be involved in arranging scientific sessions, lectures and seminars held at the ASM General Meeting; and
  4. Attend and network at specialized programs such as division meetings, social events and other events at ASM General Meeting.

Each Division contributes to the development the scientific program at the ASM General Meeting (the annual membership meeting of the Society). Each year, the Division Leadership encourages the input of session topic ideas and the identification of key speakers to help produce a quality program at the meeting where over 75% of the invited speaker sessions and 100% of the poster program is developed or managed by the Divisions. In addition to the programs produced by the Meetings Department of the ASM Staff, the Divisions disseminate this information to their members through individual websites.

Division Structure and Change

Each Division must have  a total of 300 primary and/or secondary voting eligible members officially affiliated with it to take an active part in the governance of both the Society and the Division. The Primary Members of the Division may modify the name or description of division activities using the following procedures:

  • To change the name of a division, members must agree by vote that the change is required. The newly proposed name must be sent to the Chair of the Committee on Divisions for review. Because of the Division's General Meeting Programming Activities, this information is also communicated to the General Meeting Program Committee. If there are no problems, the proposal goes to the Chair of the Meetings Board to present the issue to CPC and the ASM Council for approval.
  • To change the description of an existing division, the Division Chair should discuss any recommendations with its members, then send the revised description to ASM for review by the Committee on Divisions. The Committee on Divisions ensures that the new description does not significantly overlap those of another Division's description. Once this review is complete, the new description will be adopted and published.

Based on changes to the science and practice of microbiology, it may become necessary to modify the Division structure through the introduction of a new Division. To create a new division, at least 300 Full members must sign a petition agreeing to become either a primary or secondary member of the division if it is successfully created. Once the membership requirement has been met, the issue can be presented to CPC and ASM Council by the Chair of the Meetings Board. If approved by the ASM Council, all qualifying signatories are automatically transferred to the new division.

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