2015 History of Microbiology Research Travel Award Recipient

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The Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives (CHOMA) is pleased to announce the recipient of the 2015 History of Microbiology Research Travel Award: 

 

Ross picLauren N. Ross, M.D. 

Lauren Ross, University of Pittsburgh, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, used the award to conduct research at CHOMA on early American bacteriologists' understanding of Koch's postulates and more generally their ideas about disease causation as reflected in textbooks, lab manuals, and other materials.

 

The History of Microbiology Research Travel Awards are given to support historical research of the awardees' choosing, in areas that can be supported by materials in the CHOMA collections.  The CHOMA collections, located at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, include 9,000 volumes on microbiology and related topics, photographs, biographical materials, topical files on various aspects of microbiology, records of the Society from its founding in 1899 to the present, and several collections of personal papers. 

 

APPLY NOW FOR HISTORY OF MICROBIOLOGY TRAVEL AWARDS –

For more information on the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives, and to learn how to apply for a History of Microbiology Research Travel Award, visit the website at www.asm.org/choma    

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History of Microbiology Lecture at ASM 2015 General Meeting

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Annual History of Microbiology Lecture  

Title:              From Humor to Virus: The Microbiology of Yellow Fever in Historical Perspective 

 

Lecturer:        Mariola Espinosa, Ph.D.

                       Associate Professor, History Department

                       University of Iowa

 

Date:              Sunday, May 31, 2015

 

Time:              4:45 pm - 6:30 pm

 

Location:        New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Meeting Room 343

 

Session #:       080

 

Description:  

This lecture will trace the history of yellow fever, a viral disease that profoundly affected New Orleans, other Gulf Coast cities, and the larger Atlantic world. It will begin by describing the debates among doctors and scientists that led yellow fever to be identified as a distinct disease and distinguished from other fevers. Next, it will trace the history of the identification of the disease's etiology, paying particular attention to the contributions of Carlos Finlay, John Carter, Jesse Lazear, and Walter Reed, and follow the subsequent efforts to eradicate the disease. It will then turn to how the virus that causes yellow fever was finally identified and how a complete understanding of its ecology forced a new strategy of containment.

 

Convener:

James A. Poupard

Pharma Inst. of Philadelphia, Inc., Philadelphia, PA

Chair, Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives

 

Any Questions? Contact ASM Archivist at   jkarr@asmusa.org   OR   archives@asmusa.org

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History of Microbiology at the ASM 2015 General Meeting

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2015 General Meeting Programs Sponsored by the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives Committee

 
115th ASM General Meeting
New Orleans, LA
May 30 – June 2, 2015

 

The Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives (CHOMA) Committee is pleased to announce its schedule of asm2015 meeting events:

 

For more information, contact ASM Archivist at    jkarr@asmusa.org   OR  archives@asmusa.org

 

 CHOMA History Programs at ASM 2015 General Meeting

 

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CHOMA History Programs at ASM 2015 General Meeting

 

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2015 General Meeting Programs Sponsored by the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives (CHOMA) Committee

 

 

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Annual History of Microbiology Lecture  

Title:              From Humor to Virus: The Microbiology of Yellow Fever in Historical Perspective 

 

Lecturer:        Mariola Espinosa, Ph.D.

                       Associate Professor, History Department

                       University of Iowa

 

Date:              Sunday, May 31, 2015

 

Time:              4:45 pm - 6:30 pm

 

Location:        New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Meeting Room 343

 

Session #:       080

 

Description:  

This lecture will trace the history of yellow fever, a viral disease that profoundly affected New Orleans, other Gulf Coast cities, and the larger Atlantic world. It will begin by describing the debates among doctors and scientists that led yellow fever to be identified as a distinct disease and distinguished from other fevers. Next, it will trace the history of the identification of the disease's etiology, paying particular attention to the contributions of Carlos Finlay, John Carter, Jesse Lazear, and Walter Reed, and follow the subsequent efforts to eradicate the disease. It will then turn to how the virus that causes yellow fever was finally identified and how a complete understanding of its ecology forced a new strategy of containment.

 

Convener:

James A. Poupard

Pharma Inst. of Philadelphia, Inc., Philadelphia, PA

Chair, Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives

 

Any Questions? Contact ASM Archivist at   jkarr@asmusa.org   OR   archives@asmusa.org

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History of Microbiology Exhibit: 

Exhibit:          Endless Curiosity: The Discoveries and Legacy of Antony van Leeuwenhoek

Curated by:    Jeff Karr, ASM Archivist

Date:              Sunday, May 31, 2015 - Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Time:              10:45 am - 4:00 pm (Sunday-Monday); 10:45 am - 2:45 pm (Tuesday)     

Location:        New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Exhibit Hall (in ASM Booth area)

 

The CHOMA Exhibit, Endless Curiosity: The Discoveries and Legacy of Antony van Leeuwenhoek, will display materials from the ASM Archives, including a replica of a Leeuwenhoek microscope, a 1685 Latin edition of three of Leeuwenhoek's letters, and some original issues (1680s) of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, among other items.

 

Any Questions? Contact ASM Archivist at   jkarr@asmusa.org   OR   archives@asmusa.org

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Poster Session on History of Microbiology: 

The History of Microbiology Poster Session presents posters on a wide range of topics in the history of microbiology: scientists, microbes, and techniques.

 

Date:  Sunday, May 31, 2015

Time:  10:45 am - 12 Noon     

Place: New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Poster Hall

 

Any Questions? Contact ASM Archivist at   jkarr@asmusa.org   OR   archives@asmusa.org

 

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Rockefeller University Designated a Milestones in Microbiology Site by ASM

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The Rockefeller University has been named a Milestones in Microbiology site by the American Society for Microbiology.  

RockefCeremony

 

SITE DEDICATION CEREMONY

The formal site dedication took place as follows:

 

Date:  Wednesday, April 8, 2015, at 12 Noon

Place:  The Cohn Library, The Rockefeller University 

Program:  

    • Remarks by Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Rockefeller University President
    • Overview of Milestones Program and Introduction of ASM President by Doug Eveleigh, Chair of Milestones in Microbiology
    • Plaque Presentation by Stanley Maloy, Past President of the ASM
    • Lecture by James Darnell, Vincent Astor Professor Emeritus:  “Rockefeller University’s Early Role in Microbiology”
    • Lecture by Emil Gotschlich, R. Gwin Follis-Chevron Professor Emeritus:  “History of Meningitis Research at Rockefeller."
    • Walking tour conducted by University historian Carol Moberg: Site for “Milestones” plaque (Collaborative Research Center) and Rockefeller University historical laboratory (Flexner Hall)

 

Plaque Presentation:

      • Stanley Maloy, Past President of the ASM, presented the official Milestones in Microbiology plaque on behalf of the Society.      
      • Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Rockefeller University President, accepted the plaque on behalf of the University

 

 RATIONALE FOR THE MILESTONES DESIGNATION

The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research (now known as Rockefeller University), founded in 1901, was the first institute in the U.S. entirely devoted to using biomedical science to understand the underlying cause of disease.  Its initial focus on infectious disease and its continued leadership in fields such as bacteriology, virology, parasitology, immunology, and genetics have led to numerous contributions to the microbiological sciences.

The ASM Milestones designation is made in recognition of the many outstanding achievements of Rockefeller scientists, and in particular for the following ground-breaking discoveries:

  • The 1944 discovery by Oswald T. Avery, Colin M. MacLeod, and Maclyn McCarty that DNA from one pneumococcal type can transform cells of a different type, a finding that pointed to DNA as the molecule of heredity.
  • Peyton Rous’ formulation of the viral theory of cancer causation after his 1910 discovery that a virus in a chicken sarcoma could cause the same tumor type in inoculated healthy animals, a theory that was proven correct nearly a half century after he proposed it.
  • The development by Emil C. Gotschlich of purified capsular polysaccharide vaccines against groups C and A meningococcal bacteria, which have prevented meningitis in infants, children, and American military recruits since 1970.

 

THE MILESTONES PLAQUE

Plaque-Rockefeller-FINAL-2-19-15

 

PDF of Plaque:  Click Here

 

Press Release Announcing Milestones DesignationClick Here

 

VISIT TO THE “FLEXNER LAB”:

After the Milestones ceremony, Carol Moberg led a tour to the “Flexner Lab,” a historic lab that has been transformed into a small museum housing artifacts from Rockefeller University's past and serving as a venue for special exhibits relating to Rockefeller University history.  The lab contains fixtures and other items dating to the early 20th Century.  Among the artifacts on display are glassware created in the university’s glassblowing shop (the university also had a woodworking shop and machine shop where scientists worked with master craftsmen to create tools to solve problems), benches, fume hoods, air and gas nozzles, and heavy stone bench tops that are twice as thick as modern ones.  Of special note are several glass perfusion pumps (1930s) invented by Rockefeller’s Alexis Carrel and aviator Charles Lindbergh.  The pumps were used in animal experiments to keep whole organs alive outside the body, and were the precursors of the heart-lung machines used in open heart surgery beginning in the 1940s.  Lindbergh’s interest and involvement in this invention stemmed from his personal experience:  his sister- in-law had heart problems that were untreatable because technology at the time did not allow for organs to be removed and preserved during surgery. 

A special exhibit commemorating the Milestones designation was on display in the lab, featuring photographs related to the accomplishments and scientists cited on the plaque.  Also displayed were photos and documents relating to the four Rockefeller scientists who have served as ASM president: 

ASM Presidents:

1936 – Thomas Milton Rivers (1888-1962) 

1941 – Oswald Theodore Avery (1877-1955)

1943 – Rebecca Craighill Lancefield (1895-1981)

1952 – René Jules Dubos  (1901-1976)

 

ASM Milestones Exhibit Poster

Several reprints addressing Rockefeller history were available to visitors.  Copies were obtained for the ASM Archives:   

 

MORE ABOUT THE ROCKEFELLER UNIVERSITY

The Rockefeller University is one of the world’s foremost biomedical research institutes and is dedicated to conducting innovative, high-quality research to improve the understanding of life for the benefit of humanity.

 

Founded in 1901, The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research was the country’s first institution devoted exclusively to biomedical research. In the 1950s, the Institute expanded its mission to include graduate education and began training new generations of scientists to become research leaders around the world. In 1965, it was renamed The Rockefeller University. Its more than 70 laboratories conduct biological and biomedical research and a community of over 2,000 faculty, students, postdocs, technicians, clinicians and administrative personnel work at the University’s 14-acre campus.

 

Rockefeller’s unique approach to science has led to some of the world’s most revolutionary contributions to biology and medicine. During Rockefeller’s history, 24 of its scientists have won Nobel Prizes, 21 have won Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards and 20 have garnered the National Medal of Science, the highest science award given by the United States.

 

For more information, go to www.rockefeller.edu

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THE MILESTONES IN MICROBIOLOGY PROGRAM AND LIST OF MILESTONES SITES

For general information on the Milestones in Microbiology program, a list of current Milestones sites, and guidelines for nominating a site for Milestones recognition, click here

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Any questions?  Contact the ASM Archivist at archives@asmusa.org or jkarr@asmusa.org

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