New Research Sheds Light on Popular Probiotic's Benefits for the Gut

Washington, D.C. – April 14, 2015 – In recent years, research into the benefits of gut bacteria has exploded. Scientists across the globe are examining how these microbes can help improve health and prevent disease.

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Genetically Engineered Salmonella Promising as Anti-cancer Therapy

Washington, D.C. - April 14, 2015 - A new study has demonstrated that genetically modified Salmonella can be used to kill cancer cells. The study is published in this week’s issue of mBio, an American Society for Microbiology online-only, open access journal.

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Compound from Soil Microbe Inhibits Biofilm Formation

Washington, D.C. - March 30, 2015 - Researchers have shown that a known antibiotic and antifungal compound produced by a soil microbe can inhibit another species of microbe from forming biofilms—microbial mats that frequently are medically harmful—without killing that microbe. The findings may apply to other microbial species, and can herald a plethora of scientific and societal benefits. The research is published online ahead of print on March 30, 2015, in the Journal of Bacteriology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. The study will be printed in a special section of the journal that will comprise of papers from the 5th ASM Conference on Cell-Cell Communication in Bacteria.

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The Rockefeller University designated a “Milestones in Microbiology” site by the American Society for Microbiology

Washington, D.C. - April 6, 2015 - The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) will name The Rockefeller University a “Milestones in Microbiology” site, recognizing the institution and its scientists for their significant contributions toward advancing the science of microbiology. The announcement will be made at a formal dedication ceremony on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, at Noon at Rockefeller’s New York City campus.The content of this page is restricted to ASM Members only.

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The American Academy of Microbiology releases new report titled “Harnessing the Power of Microbes as Therapeutics: Bugs as Drugs”

WASHINGTON, D.C. - March 27, 2015 - A new report recently released by the American Academy of Microbiology discusses how specific microbes can be modified to enhance their therapeutic potential for treating human diseases such as cancer and antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. Bacteria and viruses are not always categorized as harmful microorganisms. In fact, these groups of microbes can be beneficial and can actively participate in many biological processes. With the perception of microorganisms being our partners, research is now being conducted to use microbes to treat disease and enhance human health. Some viruses and species of bacteria can be targeted to kill cancer cells while others can be deployed to replicate in and kill tumors.The content of this page is restricted to ASM Members only.


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