ASM Newsroom

Welcome to ASM's Newsroom, a resource for journalists seeking information relating to the microbiological sciences.  Members of the media and the general public can access current and archived press releases from the Society as well as tipsheets highlighting the latest research published in our journals or presented at our meetings.

News Media Contacts:

Aleea Khan
Media Manager

Joanna Urban
Media Assistant


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Research Ushers in New Era of Boutique Chocolate

Washington, DC – November 20, 2015 - A team of Belgian researchers has shown that the yeasts used to ferment cocoa during chocolate production can modify the aroma of the resulting chocolate. “This makes it possible to create a whole range of boutique chocolates to match everyone’s favorite flavor, similar...


Coconut Oil Shows Promise in the Prevention of Deadly Bloodstream Infection

Washington, DC – November 18, 2015 – Coconut oil may be effective at combating infection with Candida albicans, according to a study published November 18th in the American Society for Microbiology’s new open access journal mSphere. The study found that coconut oil consumption reduced gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans in...


Fungus Causes Emerging Snake Disease Found in Eastern U.S.

Washington, D.C.—November 17, 2015—Researchers working for the U.S. Geological Survey have identified the fungal culprit behind an often deadly skin infection in snakes in the eastern U.S. Published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, the research shows that Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola is the...


Irradiated Anthrax Can Be Sequenced – Fast!

Washington, DC – November 13, 2015 - These days, mail addressed to selected government offices gets irradiated, in order to kill any biological agents, notably anthrax spores. The downside of this is that viable spores have been needed to identify the anthrax strain, which can be critical to treating those...


One Course of Antibiotics Can Affect Diversity of Microorganisms in the Gut

Washington, DC – November 10, 2015 – A single course of antibiotics has enough strength to disrupt the normal makeup of microorganisms in the gut for as long as a year, potentially leading to antibiotic resistance, European researchers reported this week in mBio®, an online open-access journal of the American...


New Technique Could Prevent Biofilms on Catheters and Medical Implants

Washington, DC – October 30, 2015 –  Biofilms—mats of bacteria similar to the plaque that grows on teeth—frequently coat the surfaces of catheters, and of various medical implants and prostheses, where they can threaten lives or lead to failure of the implants. Antibiotics are impotent against biofilms. Now Jakub Kwiecinski,...


American Society for Microbiology Members Propose Initiative to Harness Earth’s Microbiomes

Washington, DC - October 28, 2015 - An article published in Science on October 28th steered by key ASM members highlights the need for an interdisciplinary initiative that would focus on better understanding microbial interactions that could allow for progress in the fields of agriculture, health and energy, to name...


Multi-tasking Flu Vaccine Could Provide Better Protection against Outbreaks

Washington, D.C.—October 27, 2015—Australian researchers have found a way to boost the effectiveness and cross-protective capabilities of an influenza A vaccine by adding a simple component. Published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, the research in mice could lead to better seasonal...


American Society for Microbiology designates Ocean Station ALOHA as a Milestones in Microbiology site

Washington, DC – October 27, 2015 – Ocean Station Aloha, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM) has been designated a Milestones in Microbiology site by the American Society for Microbiology. 


Bacteriophage Treatment Decontaminates Infant Formula

Washington, DC – October 23, 2015 - A phage showed strong anti-microbial activity against a type of food-borne bacterium that often kills infants after infecting them via infant formula. Phages are viruses that infect only bacteria. The research is published October 23 online in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal...