Tuesday, 30 May 2017 10:26

Clinical Microbiology Issues Update - May 2017

PSAB ACTIVITIES

  • ASM Letter on the Appointment of USDA Chief Scientist
  • ASM Letter on State Department Notice on High Risk Visa Applications
  • ASM Comments on the Administration’s FY 2018 Budget to Congress
  • ASM Congressional Briefing: Vaccines, Healthcare’s First Line of Defense
  • ASM Comments on Diagnostic Accuracy and Innovation Act (DAIA) Draft Legislation
  • ASM Publishes May Issue of the Minority Microbiology Mentor

ASM NEWS, JOURNAL ARTICLES AND UPDATES

  • Changing Diagnostic Paradigms for Microbiology
  • ASM Microbe Sessions of Interest
  • ASM Conferences
  • ASM Journal Articles of Interest
  • ASM Press
  • Journal Articles of Interest

FEDERAL AGENCY UPDATES

  • Enterococci May Have Evolved Antimicrobial Resistance Millions of Years Ago
  • Researchers Connect Brain Blood Vessel Lesions to Intestinal Bacteria
  • NIH Scientists Advance Understanding of Herpesvirus Infection
  • FDA Approves Two Hepatitis C Drugs for Pediatric Patients
  • CDC Updates Guidance on Interpretation of Zika Testing Results for Pregnant Women
  • Dispatches from the Front Lines: CDC’s Disease Detective Conference
  • MMWR Articles of Interest

OTHER INFORMATION AND UPDATES

  • ASCP’s 2017 Wage Survey Is Available for Participation Until May 31
  • AACC Flu Test Reclassification Webinar
  • 69th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo
  • ASCP Annual Meeting

PSAB ACTIVITIES

ASM Letter on the Appointment of USDA Chief Scientist
On May 23, ASM authored a letter to Senators Roberts and Stabenow expressing concern about the nomination for the Undersecretary for Research, Education and Economics at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), a position that also serves as the Agency’s chief scientist. The appointment of a qualified scientist with a distinguished background in agricultural research and education is critical to the advancement of the US agriculture economy.

ASM Letter on State Department Notice on High Risk Visa Applications
On May 17, ASM sent a letter to David T. Donahue, Acting Secretary of Bureau of Consular Affairs in the Department of State with concerns about the possible effect of enhanced vetting on the processing of visa applications for the vast majority of applicants who enter the US to study and engage in research activities.

ASM Comments on the Administration’s FY 2018 Budget to Congress
The American Society for Microbiology urges Congress to reject the Administration’s proposed severe cuts to science and public health programs as it begins consideration of the FY 2018 budget for the federal government. The ASM applauds Congress for the bipartisan support for science in the recently enacted FY 2017 Omnibus bill. We implore Congress to once again make science and public health national priorities and appropriate the highest, sustained levels of funding for research and public health in the FY 2018 budget.

ASM Congressional Briefing: Vaccines, Healthcare’s First Line of Defense
The ASM held a Congressional Briefing on May 16, focused largely on the topic of childhood vaccination. Featured speakers were Nancy Messonnier, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Bruce Gellin, of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, and Paul A. Offit, from the University of Pennsylvania.

ASM Comments on Diagnostic Accuracy and Innovation Act (DAIA) Draft Legislation
ASM, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology joined to offer comments to Representatives Bucshon and DeGette on the draft Diagnostic Accuracy and Innovation Act (DAIA). This Act builds upon previous efforts to establish a modern framework for the regulation of both in vitro diagnostic tests and laboratory-developed tests (LDTs).

ASM Letter on the Appointment of USDA Chief Scientist
On May 23, ASM authored a letter to Senators Roberts and Stabenow expressing concern about the nomination for the Undersecretary for Research, Education and Economics at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), a position that also serves as the Agency’s chief scientist. The appointment of a qualified scientist with a distinguished background in agricultural research and education is critical to the advancement of the US agriculture economy.

ASM Publishes May Issue of the Minority Microbiology Mentor
The May issue of the Minority Microbiology Mentor has been published by the Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities (CMIIM).

ASM NEWS, JOURNAL ARTICLES AND UPDATES

Changing Diagnostic Paradigms for Microbiology
The American Academy of Microbiology, the honorific branch of the American Society for Microbiology, has published the report “Changing Diagnostic Paradigms for Microbiology.” This report covers many advances in clinical microbiology and point of care testing.

ASM Microbe Sessions of Interest

Friday, June 2

  • SESSION 006: Lab Director Budgeting 101: A How-to-Guide on Getting a Laboratory Test Approved in a Fiscally Tight Hospital Environment, 7:30 AM, Room 355
  • SESSION 012: Volunteer Opportunities with CLSI to Address Antimicrobial Resistance, 7:30 AM, Room 255
  • SESSION 111: What's a Lab to do? Test Interpretation beyond the Result, 3:00 PM, CPHM Track Hub, Exhibit Hall D, Exhibit and Poster Hall

Saturday, June 3

  • SESSION 151: Next Generation Sequencing in Clinical Virology, 7:30 AM, Room 346
  • SESSION 204: Administering the Clinical/Public Health Microbiology Laboratory, 12:15 PM, Exhibit Hall D, Exhibit and Poster Hall
  • SESSION 276: Microbiology Total Laboratory Automation Revisited: Lessons Learned and Future Directions, 2:30 PM, Room 209
  • SESSION 291: Clinical Microbiology Updates from the Public and Scientific Affairs Board, 4:00 PM, Room 265

Sunday, June 4

  • SESSION 306: The LEAN Approach to Clinical Microbiology Testing, 7:30 AM, Room 356
  • SESSION 427: Emerging Challenges in Solid Organ Transplant Infectious Diseases, 2:30 PM, Room 244
  • SESSION 412: IQCP: Assessment from Inspections and Audits, What Have we Learned, 2:30 PM, CPHM Track Hub, Exhibit Hall D, Exhibit and Poster Hall

Monday, June

  • SESSION 453: Consultative Microbiology: Test Interpretations that Explain What the Microbiology Report Does Not! 7:30 AM, Room 356
  • SESSION 465: Advanced Diagnostics for Facilitating Risk Communication in Outbreak Situations Organized in Cooperation with the European Society of Clinical Microbiologists and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), 11:00 AM, Room 207
  • SESSION 468: Bad Bugs, New Drugs - but No Tests! 11:00 AM, Room 244
  • SESSION 472: Culture-Independent Testing: Interface of Clinical Care and Public Health 11:00 AM, Room 208

ASM Conferences

2nd ASM Conference on Rapid Applied Microbial Next-Generation Sequencing and Bioinformatic Pipelines
October 8–11, 2017
Washington, DC

6th ASM Conference on Cell–Cell Communication in Bacteria
October 16–19, 2017
Athens, GA

ASM Conference on Vibrio2017: The Biology of Vibrios
November 12–15, 2017
Chicago, IL

Click for a complete list of upcoming ASM conferences.

ASM Journal Articles of Interest

Scientists Identify Novel Technique to Build Better Vaccine Adjuvants
A study published mBio demonstrates that a novel technique can be used to build better vaccines for infectious diseases says author Robert Ernst, of the University of Maryland, Baltimore. The study shows that a practical method, bacterial enzymatic combinatorial chemistry (BECC), can be can be used to generate functionally diverse molecules that can potentially be used as adjuvants

Novel Compound Uses a Cell’s Innate Defense System to Block Replication of Zika
Vertebrates cells have evolved pathways that act like an internal defense, inhibiting viral infections by preventing replication of the pathogens. Drugs that activate those existing systems suggest a promising novel approach to treating dangerous infections by Zika and other viruses, say researchers from the Oregon Health and Science University. The study, published in the May 2 issue of mBio, reports on a novel compound that triggers a cell’s antiviral system against Zika, Chikungunya and Dengue.

Plague Bacteria Take Refuge in Amoebae
Y. pestis spreads from rodent to rodent, and sometimes to human, often via fleas. It uses the protective niche of the amoeba to abide when conditions are unfavorable to its spread, when rodent hosts are scarce. The research is published April 28th in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

ASM Press

A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition
Authors: J. Michael Miller and Shelley A. Miller
Electronic, Paperback, 209 pages, illustrations, index
(ISBN: 9781555819613)

Myeloid Cells in Health and Disease: A Synthesis
Editor: Siamon Gordon
Hardcover, 892 pages, full-color illustrations
(ISBN: 9781555819187)

Urinary Tract Infections, Second Edition
Editors: Matthew A. Mulvey, David Klumpp, Ann Stapleton
Hardcover, 690 pages, full-color illustrations, index.
(ISBN: 9781555817398)

Journal Articles of Interest

Validation of Metagenomic Next-Generation Sequencing Tests for Universal Pathogen Detection
Metagenomic sequencing can be used for detection of any pathogens using unbiased, shotgun next generation sequencing (NGS), without the need for sequence-specific amplification. Proof-of-concept has been demonstrated in infectious disease outbreaks of unknown causes and in patients with suspected infections but negative results for conventional tests.

Zika Spreads Undetected for Many Months
Genetic analysis of samples collected as the Zika virus (ZIKV) spread throughout the Americas after its introduction in 2013 or 2014 has shown that the virus circulated undetected for up to a year in some regions before it came to the attention of public health authorities. Genetic sequencing has also enabled scientists to recreate the epidemiological and evolutionary paths the virus took as it spread and split into the distinct subtypes, or clades, that have been detected in the Americas. The research, published in Nature, was supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

FEDERAL AGENCY UPDATES

Enterococci May Have Evolved Antimicrobial Resistance Millions of Years Ago
Enterococci are the bane of hospitals, causing thousands of multidrug-resistant infections in patients each year. Now, NIAID-funded researchers have traced evidence of the bacteria’s evolutionary history back 425 million years.

Researchers Connect Brain Blood Vessel Lesions to Intestinal Bacteria
An NIH-funded pre-clinical study in mice and humans suggests that bacteria in the gut can influence the structure of the brain’s blood vessels, and may be responsible for producing malformations that can lead to stroke or epilepsy.

NIH Scientists Advance Understanding of Herpesvirus Infection
Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections last a lifetime. Once a person has been infected, the virus can remain dormant (latent) for years before periodically reactivating to cause recurrent disease. This poorly understood cycle has frustrated scientists for years. Now, NIH scientists have identified a set of protein complexes that are recruited to viral genes and stimulate both initial infection and reactivation from latency.

FDA Approves Two Hepatitis C Drugs for Pediatric Patients
On April 7, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved supplemental applications for Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) and Harvoni (ledipasvir and sofosbuvir) to treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) in children ages 12 to 17. Harvoni and Sovaldi were previously approved to treat HCV in adults.

CDC Updates Guidance on Interpretation of Zika Testing Results for Pregnant Women
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a Health Alert Notice with updated guidance for healthcare professionals to interpret Zika test results for women who live in, or frequently travel (daily or weekly) to areas with a CDC Zika travel notice. This change is being made because CDC’s Zika testing guidance for pregnant women relies, in part, on a test [Zika virus IgM ELISA] to detect Zika antibodies or proteins that the body makes to fight Zika infections. New data suggest that Zika virus infection may result in Zika antibodies staying in the body for months after infection for some individuals. As a result, results of these tests may not be able to determine whether women were infected before or after they became pregnant.

Dispatches from the Front Lines: CDC’s Disease Detective Conference
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) held its 66th Annual Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Conference April 24–27, 2017, in Atlanta. The conference included a special session featuring EIS officers describing their work responding to the Zika virus outbreak, Laboratory Leadership Service (LLS) fellows reporting on their efforts to advance laboratory biosafety and quality, and a media-availability session with EIS officers fresh off of the front lines of battling emerging health threats.

MMWR Articles of Interest

Notes from the Field: Ongoing Transmission of Candida auris in Health Care
In June 2016, CDC released a clinical alert about the emerging, and often multidrug-resistant, fungus Candida auris and later reported the first seven U.S. cases of infection through August 2016. Six of these cases occurred before the clinical alert and were retrospectively identified. As of May 12, 2017, a total of 77 U.S. clinical cases of C. auris had been reported to CDC from seven states: New York (53 cases), New Jersey (16), Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Oklahoma, one case each.

Using Molecular Characterization to Support Investigations of Outbreaks of Cryptosporidiosis
Cryptosporidiosis is a nationally notifiable gastrointestinal illness caused by parasitic protozoa of the genus Cryptosporidium, which can cause profuse, watery diarrhea that can last up to 2–3 weeks in immunocompetent patients and can lead to life-threatening wasting and malabsorption in immunocompromised patients. Cryptosporidium has emerged as the leading etiology of nationally notified recreational water–associated outbreaks, particularly those associated with aquatic facilities (i.e., physical places that contain one or more aquatic venues [e.g., pools] and support infrastructure). This report highlights cryptosporidiosis outbreaks associated with aquatic facilities in three states (Alabama, Arizona, and Ohio) in 2016. This report also illustrates the use of CryptoNet, the first U.S. molecularly based surveillance system for a parasitic disease, to further elucidate Cryptosporidium chains of transmission and cryptosporidiosis epidemiology.

Incidence and Trends of Infections with Pathogens Transmitted Commonly through Food and the Effect of Increasing Use of Culture-Independent Diagnostic Tests on Surveillance
Foodborne diseases represent a substantial public health concern in the United States. CDC’s Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) monitors cases reported from 10 U.S. sites of laboratory-diagnosed infections caused by nine enteric pathogens commonly transmitted through food. This report describes preliminary surveillance data for 2016 on the nine pathogens and changes in incidences compared with 2013 through 2015.

OTHER INFORMATION AND UPDATES

ASCP Wage Salary Extended until May 31
The American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) is conducting its biennial wage survey of laboratory professionals in the field. Along with filling out the survey yourself, ASCP asks that you forward this email to your laboratory professional colleagues to allow the collection of data for all laboratory positions.

AACC Flu Test Reclassification Webinar
FDA Reclassification of Rapid Antigen Flu Testing and Why it's an Opportunity for Lab Leadership
June 7, 2017 1:00 PM
Registration is now open.

69th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo
July 30-August 2, 2017
San Diego, CA
The online abstract submission system is now open.

ASCP Annual Meeting
September 6-8, 2017
Chicago, IL
Registration is now open.

Last modified on Tuesday, 30 May 2017 14:31

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