Jesse Noar

Jesse Noar

Jesse Noar is microbiologist with a PhD from North Carolina State University and Bachelor's from Cornell. Most of his research has focused on the amazing abilities and potential uses of bacteria, especially those found in soil. Jesse hosts the BacterioFiles podcast highlighting the most interesting recent microbiology research on all kinds of different microbes, part of the ASM family of podcasts. Learn more at asm.org/bacteriofiles or at www.bacteriofiles.com.

Filament-forming organisms help bacteria swim through soil and exchange genes with each other! Also, new feature: microbe of the episode!

Tardigrades have an interesting way of surviving complete drying out: by producing proteins lacking a stable structure!

Viruses infecting cyanobacteria can produce proteins that actually help their host capture light better!

Roundworms in soil can carry with them bacteria they eat to grow new food, like farmers!

Filament-forming organisms help bacteria swim through soil and exchange genes with each other! Also, new feature: microbe of the episode!

Ancient microbes built underwater structures that look like sunken, ancient cities.

Filament-forming organisms help bacteria swim through soil and exchange genes with each other! Also, new feature: microbe of the episode!

Using predatory bacteria to extract valuable bioplastics from other bacteria.

Gut microbes can even affect formation/remodeling of bones.

Beneficial microbes defend roundworms against a pathogen and pressure it to evolve to cause less disease.

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