Thursday, 29 June 2017 09:18

Keeping Microbiology in Nursing Programs: Make Your Voice Heard

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Published in Teaching Microbiology

Written by Bethany Adamec

Many nursing programs (particularly those offering a two-year associate’s degree in nursing) are facing pressure to reduce or eliminate microbiology in their curriculum. This stems from numerous causes, including pressure to reduce the amount of time students spend in these programs, a sense that microbiology isn’t relevant for nurses, and the idea that microbiology can be integrated into other courses. At the same time, new technologies and cutting-edge microbial science are producing more information than ever that’s relevant to nurses. We invite you to join ASM’s Task Committee on Microbiology in the Nursing Curriculum at the ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE) 2017 for a series of sessions on challenges facing microbiology in the nursing curriculum, ASM Curriculum Guidelines and a Toolkit to foster the inclusion of microbiology, and a community discussion surrounding these topics.

In these sessions the microbiology education community can hear directly from Committee members about how the competencies and knowledge that RNs need (including those evaluated by the National Council Licensure Examination Registered Nurse exam) align with the ASM Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Microbiology. Committee members will also provide an overview of challenges to including microbiology in the nursing curriculum, of challenges facing two-year schools and nursing programs in particular, and a toolkit instructors can use to showcase the importance of microbiology in the nursing curriculum.

Opportunities for community feedback will be central to these sessions. The Committee needs your input on the alignment between the ASM Curriculum Guidelines and skills that RNs need, challenges that may not have been considered, and other documents for the toolkit developed by the Committee.

Besides the above sessions, there are many other great reasons to attend ASMCUE, including the latest science for your classroom, opportunities for grad students, postdocs, and early-career faculty, and travel awards. If you can’t attend ASMCUE this year, this isn’t your only chance to provide feedback on the work of this Committee. We’ll be seeking input from microbiology educators in the coming months via this blog, ASM’s microedu listserv, and other sources. We look forward to your participation!

 

Bethany Adamec is a Science Education Specialist at ASM, where she communicates about ASM’s work in student and faculty professional development, supports the ASM Education Board, and works with colleagues to promote evidence-based education reform. 

Education

Bethany Adamec is a Science Education Specialist at ASM, where she communicates about ASM’s work in student and faculty professional development, supports the ASM Education Board, and works with colleagues to promote evidence-based education reform.

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