Julie Wolf

Julie Wolf

Julie Wolf is the ASM Science Communications Specialist. She contributes to the ASM social media and blog network and hosts the Meet the Microbiologist podcast. She also runs workshops at ASM conferences to help scientists improve their own communication skills. Follow Julie on Twitter for more ASM and microbiology highlights at @JulieMarieWolf.

Julie earned her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, focusing on medical mycology and infectious disease. Outside of her work at ASM, she maintains a strong commitment to scientific education and teaches molecular biology at the community biolab, Genspace. She lives in beautiful New York City.

Peter Hotez talks about neglected tropical diseases: what are they, where are they found, and where did the term “neglected tropical disease” come from, anyway?

For over 100 years, Histoplasma capsulatum was thought to be a single fungal species with several variant strain variations. New analyses of genome sequences reveal the genus Histoplasma contains at least four species, and may contain more.

A cure for HIV infection remains elusive. A new model to study HIV reactivation in quiescent cells, described in Journal of Virology, may help researchers better understand infection and devise effective treatment strategies.

Persistence, like antibiotic resistance, can lead to drug failure when treating bacterial infections. A new Antimicrobial Agent and Chemotherapy study extends previous findings that a drug-metabolite cocktail may increase drug efficiency when treating Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Thursday, 23 November 2017 08:24

Influenza vaccine and susceptibility - MTM 70

Stacey Schultz-Cherry explains the selection process to choose the influenza virus strains to include in the annual influenza vaccine.

Microbiology-related research is almost inevitably tied to improving public health, but some research is more immediately applicable than others. How do the microbial sciences improve public health? We list some of the many ways, and invite you to share your examples 

Reporting the sex of mice and cell lines used in studies can help researchers determine if biological sex is a variable in disease outcome, argues Sabra Klein in an mBio editorial.

Microbiome studies have long focused on the bacterial members that reside in different areas of the human body. A new study from mBio shows that a tweaked protocol can better identify archaeal microbiome members too. Learn which findings surprised senior scientist Christine Moissl-Eichinger on mBiosphere.

Gigi Kwik Gronvall talks to MTM about the importance of biopreparedness. Gronvall discusses her work in creating policies around potential natural, accidental, and man-made pandemics.

People can contract campylobacteriosis by eating contaminated chickens, and a new Infection and Immunity study demonstrates the chicken microbiome influences C. jejuni colonization. mBiosphere summarizes and discusses what this may mean for human campylobacteriosis cases.

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