Julie Wolf

Julie Wolf

Julie Wolf is the ASM Science Communications Specialist. She contributes to the ASM social media and blog network and hosts the Meet the Microbiologist podcast. She also runs workshops at ASM conferences to help scientists improve their own communication skills. Follow Julie on Twitter for more ASM and microbiology highlights at @JulieMarieWolf.

Julie earned her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, focusing on medical mycology and infectious disease. Outside of her work at ASM, she maintains a strong commitment to scientific education and teaches molecular biology at the community biolab, Genspace. She lives in beautiful New York City.

Friday, 23 February 2018 18:40

How does influenza jump between species?

Understanding how influenza can jump into a new species, and how it adapts once inside its new host, may help scientists better predict pandemic strains. Three recent Journal of Virology reports discuss aspects of influenza A virus host adaptation.

Friday, 16 February 2018 17:01

A whale of a microbiome tale

A new Applied and Environmental Microbiology study found that the whale skin microbiome varies throughout the feeding season. Studying whale health may be a good indicator of ocean health.

Vaughn Cooper tells us what bacterial biofilms are, why biofilms differ from test tube environments, and how long-term evolution experiments combined with population genomics are teaching us how bacteria really work.

Historians and futurists have a lot to learn from each other. This was apparent during an ASM Biothreats panel where a disaster historian teamed with a disaster preparedness expert to discuss influenza. What are the lessons from the 1918 influenza pandemic, and how can we apply these lessons to be better prepared for future pandemics? 

Will decreasing antibiotics given to our livestock halt the spread of drug-resistant bacteria? A new Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy report offers a grim outlook. 

How do immune cells talk to each other? A new Infection and Immunity report describes how infected macrophages send signals to uninfected macrophages: via exosomes.

Marylynn Yates discusses how the urban water cycle and its importance in eliminating waterborne pathogens.

Friday, 26 January 2018 17:22

Where do our hand bacteria come from?

Where do hand microbiota come from? A new mSystems report investigates what proportion of hand bacteria have forehead, oral, or fecal origins. 

Many drugs that target rotavirus viroplasms – centers of viral replication and assembly – target host factors, like microtubule assembly or proteasome activity. A new Journal of Virology study identifies a drug that disrupts viroplasms by targeting a viral protein. This interaction may lead to new drug discovery for rotavirus therapies.

What is it like to treat Ebola patients while the nation watches? Colleen Kraft talks about treating the Americans who were evacuated from west Africa during the Ebola epidemic.

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