Thursday, 04 May 2017 16:14

Bat and moth antimicrobials - TWiM 151

Potential new sources of antimicrobial compounds from unusual places: the skin of bats and the intestines of moths.

Published in TWiM

Marilyn Roberts, PhD, University of Washington, presents an historical background of bacterial antibiotic resistances. In this lecture Roberts discusses the basic mechanism and elements (plasmids, transposons, integrons) of bacterial antibiotic resistance gene transfer.

Published in ASM Virtual Lectures
Friday, 24 February 2017 18:42

Richard Lenski - Evolution in a Flask

Lenski's work with E. coli has also led him into the digital world. Using computers, Lenski can achieve precise, rapid results by manipulating digital organisms. Software that evolves much like bacteria in the real world.

Published in Interviews

We now know that antibacterial soaps do not protect from preventable illness better than regular soap, but beyond that, some of these products are even shown to have deleterious long-term effects.

Published in Microbial Sciences
Friday, 09 September 2016 13:03

Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

In 2011, the NIH Clinical Center had a cluster of infections of a pathogen that tops the CDC's list of urgent threats: antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. This bacteria, which can cause bloodstream and other infections, has recently developed resistance to the class of antibiotics known as carbapenems. The outbreak at NIH started with a single infected patient who was discharged weeks before any other cases were detected. This story of antibiotic-resistant infections is becoming more common around the world, and is especially dangerous in hospitals. Dr. Julie Segre, a senior investigator at the National Human Genome Research Institute, will discuss how the outbreak was traced using state-of-the-art DNA sequencing.

Published in ASM Videos

The arrival in the US of plasmid-mediated resistance to colistin antibiotics, a last line of defense against many gram-negative bacilli, and a quorum sensing system in a eukaryote are topics of this episode hosted by Vincent, Michael, and Michele.

Published in TWiM

Lu, an Associate Professor of Biological Engineering and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, talks with Jeff Fox about efforts to develop new phage varieties, swapping in phage tail genes that enable them to target specific bacterial pathogens, including those carrying virulence or antibiotic resistance factors.

Published in Microbe Magazine
Tuesday, 23 June 2015 18:13

Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

Dr. Julie Segre, a senior investigator at the National Human Genome Research Institute, discusses how the outbreak was traced using state-of-the-art DNA sequencing.

Published in Microbes After Hours
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