Pre-cut Salad May Encourage Growth of Salmonella

Washington, DC – November 18, 2016 – A new study from the University of Leicester shows that small amounts of damage to salad leaves in bagged salads encourage the presence of Salmonella enterica. Juices released from damaged leaves also enhance the pathogen’s ability to attach to the salad’s plastic container. The research is published November 18th in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Microbes Found on New York City ATM Keypads Mostly from Human Skin, Food

WASHINGTON, DC – November 16, 2016 – Automated teller machine keypads in New York City have plenty of microbes but they’re mostly from normal human skin, household surfaces or traces of food, according to a study published this week in mSphere, an open access journal from the American Society for Microbiology.

Pesticide Exposures Can Cause Changes in Oral Microbiome

Washington, DC – November 11, 2016 – Pesticide exposure in farmworkers from agricultural communities is associated with changes in the oral microbiome. This is the first study to demonstrate such a correlation in humans. The research is published November 11th in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Predatory Bacteria Offer Potential Solution to Drug Resistance Problem

Washington, DC – November 8, 2016 – For the first time ever, scientists have used predatory bacteria to kill pneumonia in a rat animal model. The research, published online in mBio, provides evidence that predatory bacteria can be used as a therapeutic, offering a possible solution to the rise of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria from Chickens Pose Risk to Human Health

Washington, DC – November 4, 2016 – Isolates of a common poultry pathogen collected from animals in Indian bird markets were mostly resistant to multiple classes of antibiotics. The study provides the first data on prevalence and isolation of Helicobacter pullorum in India. The research is published November 4 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

First Study to Link Antibiotic Resistance with Exposure to the Disinfectant Chlorhexidine

Washington, DC – October 31, 2016 -Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria exposed to chlorhexidine-containing disinfectants can become resistant to colistin, a last resort antibiotic often used against multidrug resistant pathogens. This is the first study to link exposure to chlorhexidine with resistance to colistin in this clinically important pathogen. The research is published this week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

What Happens to a Pathogenic Fungus Grown In Space?

Washington, DC - October 26, 2016 - A new study, published this week in mSphere, provides evidence that Aspergillus fumigatus, a significant opportunistic fungal threat to human health, grows and behaves similarly on the International Space Station compared with earth. The study provides important information that can help with space exploration. As the durations of manned space missions increase, it is vitally important to understand the long-term consequences of microbial exposure on human health in closed human habitats.

Migraine Sufferers Have Higher Levels of Nitrate-reducing Microbes in their Mouths

Washington, DC – October 18, 2016 – Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine (UC San Diego) have found an association between migraines and microbes that reduce nitrates. Analyzing data from the American Gut Project, they found that migraine sufferers harbored significantly more microbes in their mouths and guts with the ability to modify nitrates compared to people who do not get migraine headaches. Their report, which is published this week in mSystems®, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, will spur more research to find out which oral microorganisms are related to migraines and how they affect health.

Researchers Obtain First Zika Sequence Isolated from Semen

Washington, DC – October 13, 2016 – A team of researchers from the United Kingdom has obtained the first complete genome sequence of Zika virus that was isolated from a semen sample. The research is published this week in Genome Announcements, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix

Washington, DC – October 11, 2016 – New research led by scientists from the University of Maryland, Baltimore demonstrated that when grown together, the fungus Candida albicans provides the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus with enhanced tolerance to antimicrobial drugs. These two pathogens are responsible for the majority of most of the infections in hospitalized patients and are often coisolated from a host. This research could have therapeutic implications, as understanding the interactions between these two diverse microbial species will aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining new targets for treating complex polymicrobial infections. The research was published this week in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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