ASM Journals

The mission of the ASM Journals program is to advance the microbiological sciences through the pursuit of scientific knowledge and dissemination of the results of fundamental and applied research. Edited by working scientists who are drawn from eminent institutions around the world, ASM Journals have delivered excellence and value for nearly 100 years. Known for their quality, rigor, and fairness, ASM Journals continue to provide current, influential coverage of basic and clinical microbial research.

To create more opportunities for researchers to get their important findings out to the global scientific community and share insights across subfields, ASM is launching two new interdisciplinary open-access journals, mSphereTM and mSystemsTM, in early 2016. mSphereTM will be led by Founding Editor in Chief Michael Imperiale, who seeks to publish high-quality work that makes fundamental contributions to our understanding of the broad field of microbiology. Jack Gilbert will serve as the Founding Editor in Chief of mSystemsTM, which will welcome submissions from researchers who focus on the microbiome, genomics, metagenomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, glycomics, bioinformatics, and computational microbiology. Both mSphere and mSystems™ will provide streamlined decisions, while carrying on ASM’s tradition for rigorous peer review. Calls for Papers are scheduled for September 2015. For more information, please visit: http://msphere.asm.org/ and http://msystems.asm.org/.

Thomson Reuters reports the following data on ASM’s journals in its most recent Journal Citation Reports®:

  • ASM journals publish 20% of all Microbiology articles, while accounting for 33% of all Microbiology citations
  • ASM publishes 4 journals in the Top 20 of Microbiology ranked by Impact Factor
  • ASM journals publish the 5 highest-cited journals in Microbiology
  • ASM journals publish the #1 journal ranked by Eigenfactor® in 2 fields
  • ASM has the top-cited journal in 4 categories

Articles published in the ASM journals receive international media attention and have been featured in the New York Times, Science Magazine, Los Angeles Times, CNN, National Public Radio (NPR), CNBC, and dozens of other media outlets.

What's New in Journals?

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Genes Found in H. pylori that Influence Biofilm Formation

Washington, DC – July 18, 2016 - Most bacteria cannot survive in the acidic environment of the human stomach, but Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of ulcers, thrives under such circumstances. Now research has shown that one of that bacterium’s regulatory proteins that helps it adapt to these stressful conditions...

07-18-2016

Progress Towards Protection from Highly Lethal Ebola, Marburg Viruses

Washington, DC – July 12, 2016 – Ebola and Marburg filovirus disease outbreaks have typically occurred as isolated events, confined to central Africa. However, the recent Ebola epidemic spread to several African countries, and caused 11,000 deaths. That epidemic underscored the need to develop vaccines and therapeutics that could be...

07-12-2016

Self-Prescribing Antibiotics is a Big Problem

Washington, DC – July 11, 2016 - Five percent of adults from a cohort of 400 people reported using antibiotics without a prescription during the previous 12 months. Twenty-five percent said they would use antibiotics without contacting a medical professional. These findings demonstrate yet another factor abetting the spread of...

07-11-2016

Colistin-Resistant Gene Detected in the U.S. for the Second Time: Investigators Alert to Its Possible Spread

Washington, DC - July 11, 2016 - For the second time, a clinical isolate of a bacterial pathogen has been detected in humans in the United States which carries the colistin resistance gene, mcr-1.  This may also be the first case to show up in the US. That would be...

07-11-2016

New Resistance Gene Found in "High Risk" Multidrug-Resistant Pathogen

Washington, DC – July 11, 2016 – A team of Italian investigators has discovered a new variant of an emerging antibiotic resistance mechanism. The new variant, dubbed mcr-1.2, confers resistance to colistin, a last-resort antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. The research is published July 11, in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy,...

07-11-2016

Boston Subway System Covered in Microbes, But They're Not Harmful

Washington, DC – June 28, 2016 – Boston’s subway system, known as the T, might be just as bacteria-laden as you’d expect but organisms found there are largely from normal human skin and incapable of causing disease, according to a study published June 28 in mSystems, an open access journal...

06-28-2016

Researchers Identify New Strategy for Decreasing Neonatal Mortality

Washington, DC - June 28, 2016 - Researchers have discovered how the bacteria Group B streptococcus (GBS) avoids detection by the immune system during pregnancy. The findings, reported in the journal mBio, could lead to the development of new drugs and strategies for treating GBS infection, which is a leading...

06-28-2016

Cross-respiration Between Oral Bacteria Leads to Worse Infections

Washington, D.C.—June 28, 2016—Researchers determined that two bacterial species commonly found in the human mouth and in abscesses, cooperate to make the pathogenic bacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, more infectious. Key to the cooperation is that the harmless partner provides the pathogen with an oxygen-rich environment that helps it flourish. The findings,...

06-28-2016

Michigan Researchers Investigate What Causes Cattle to Shed STEC: Food Safety Could Benefit

Washington, DC - June 24, 2016 - Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are foodborne pathogens spread largely by cattle, that can cause hemorrhagic colitis and kidney failure. In an effort to find ways of reducing this problem, Michigan State University investigators show that stress, and the negative energy balance associated...

06-24-2016

Beneficial Bacteria May Protect Breasts From Cancer

Washington, DC - June 24, 2016 - Bacteria that have the potential to abet breast cancer are present in the breasts of cancer patients, while beneficial bacteria are more abundant in healthy breasts, where they may actually be protecting women from cancer, according to Gregor Reid, PhD, and his collaborators....

06-24-2016

 

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