ASM Journals

The mission of the ASM Journals program is to advance the microbiological sciences through the pursuit of scientific knowledge and dissemination of the results of fundamental and applied research. Edited by working scientists who are drawn from eminent institutions around the world, ASM Journals have delivered excellence and value for nearly 100 years. Known for their quality, rigor, and fairness, ASM Journals continue to provide current, influential coverage of basic and clinical microbial research.

To create more opportunities for researchers to get their important findings out to the global scientific community and share insights across subfields, ASM is launching two new interdisciplinary open-access journals, mSphereTM and mSystemsTM, in early 2016. mSphereTM will be led by Founding Editor in Chief Michael Imperiale, who seeks to publish high-quality work that makes fundamental contributions to our understanding of the broad field of microbiology. Jack Gilbert will serve as the Founding Editor in Chief of mSystemsTM, which will welcome submissions from researchers who focus on the microbiome, genomics, metagenomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, glycomics, bioinformatics, and computational microbiology. Both mSphere and mSystems™ will provide streamlined decisions, while carrying on ASM’s tradition for rigorous peer review. Calls for Papers are scheduled for September 2015. For more information, please visit: http://msphere.asm.org/ and http://msystems.asm.org/.

Thomson Reuters reports the following data on ASM’s journals in its most recent Journal Citation Reports®:

  • ASM journals publish 20% of all Microbiology articles, while accounting for 33% of all Microbiology citations
  • ASM publishes 4 journals in the Top 20 of Microbiology ranked by Impact Factor
  • ASM journals publish the 5 highest-cited journals in Microbiology
  • ASM journals publish the #1 journal ranked by Eigenfactor® in 2 fields
  • ASM has the top-cited journal in 4 categories

Articles published in the ASM journals receive international media attention and have been featured in the New York Times, Science Magazine, Los Angeles Times, CNN, National Public Radio (NPR), CNBC, and dozens of other media outlets.

What's New in Journals?

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Hypothermia Mediated by "Magnetotactic Bacteria" Could Kill S. aureus

Washington, DC - February 12, 2016 - As Staphylococcus aureus becomes increasingly resistant to antibiotics, new methods of killing these pathogens are urgently needed. Now a team of investigators has demonstrated in laboratory rodents that a form of hyperthermia using magnetic nanocrystals, and targeted to the pathogens, can kill S....

02-12-2016

Early Diet of Infants, Not Maternal Obesity, Influences Development of Gut Microbiome

Washington, DC - February 10, 2016 - After the age of nine months, the development of the infant gut microbiota is driven by the transition to family foods, not maternal obesity, according to results from a new study. The study was published online this week in mSphere, an open-access journal...

02-10-2016

Real-time Ebola Fusion System Yields Clues to Stopping Infection

Washington, D.C.—February 9, 2016—Researchers have developed the first real-time system to watch directly through the microscope as Ebola-like virus particles fuse with human cells to infect them. Their findings, published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, reveal key host cell and viral...

02-09-2016

New Research Identifies Drug Target for Dengue Virus

Washington, DC – February 8, 2016 – No vaccine or drug has yet become available against the Dengue virus. A flavivirus like the newly prominent Zika virus, Dengue has become a leading cause of serious illness and death in some Asian and Latin American countries. Now a team of Dutch...

02-08-2016

Natural Clay Deposit May Hold Keys to Defeating Hospital Infections

Washington, D.C.—January 26, 2016— Researchers have uncovered potent antimicrobial activity in a natural clay deposit found on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. The research, published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, shows that the clay can kill members of the...

01-26-2016

S. aureus Can Spread from Blood to Eye, Endangering Vision

Washington, DC - January 25, 2016 - Nearly ten percent of cases of Staphylococcus aureus infections of the blood spread to the eyeball, according to a team of Korean clinical investigators. That spread can severely impair vision, and even cause blindness. The research was published January 11 in Antimicrobial Agents and...

01-25-2016

Recombinant Bacterium Boosts Production of Compound that Can Relieve Menopause Symptoms

Washington, DC - January 22, 2016 - A soy isoflavone derivative that goes by the scientific moniker, (S)-equol, has proven potent for mitigating menopausal symptoms. However, it has been impossible to produce in quantities sufficient for widespread commercial nutraceutical production. But now, a team of Korean researchers reports having constructed...

01-22-2016

Azithromycin During Delivery: Weighing Benefits and Costs

Washington, DC – January 13, 2016 - Some infants of lactating mothers given the antibiotic and antimalarial, azithromycin, during delivery may be protected from disease, or harmed by the drug. These findings are the results of the most comprehensive evaluation of the transfer of azithromycin into breast milk to date....

01-13-2016

Antibiotics Pave Way for C. difficile Infections by Killing Beneficial Bile Acid-Altering Bacteria

Washington DC – January 6, 2016 – New research from North Carolina State University and the University of Michigan finds that bile acids which are altered by bacteria normally living in the large intestine inhibit the growth of Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. C. diff is a harmful bacterium that...

01-06-2016

Bacterium Carrying a Cloned Bt-Gene Could Help Millions Infected with Roundworms

Washington, DC - December 18, 2015 - Intestinal nematodes and roundworms infect more than one billion people worldwide. These parasites lead to malnutrition and developmental problems, especially in children.  Unfortunately, resistance to the existing drug treatment is increasing. Now a team of researchers has successfully inserted the gene for a...

12-18-2015

 

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