Julie Wolf

Julie Wolf

Julie Wolf is the ASM Science Communications Specialist. She contributes to the ASM social media and blog network and hosts the Meet the Microbiologist podcast. She also runs workshops at ASM conferences to help scientists improve their own communication skills. Follow Julie on Twitter for more ASM and microbiology highlights at @JulieMarieWolf.

Julie earned her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, focusing on medical mycology and infectious disease. Outside of her work at ASM, she maintains a strong commitment to scientific education and teaches molecular biology at the community biolab, Genspace. She lives in beautiful New York City.

Reporting the sex of mice and cell lines used in studies can help researchers determine if biological sex is a variable in disease outcome, argues Sabra Klein in an mBio editorial.

Microbiome studies have long focused on the bacterial members that reside in different areas of the human body. A new study from mBio shows that a tweaked protocol can better identify archaeal microbiome members too. Learn which findings surprised senior scientist Christine Moissl-Eichinger on mBiosphere.

Gigi Kwik Gronvall talks to MTM about the importance of biopreparedness. Gronvall discusses her work in creating policies around potential natural, accidental, and man-made pandemics.

People can contract campylobacteriosis by eating contaminated chickens, and a new Infection and Immunity study demonstrates the chicken microbiome influences C. jejuni colonization. mBiosphere summarizes and discusses what this may mean for human campylobacteriosis cases.

Mutations that arise naturally are generally thought to require selection to become part of a population. A new Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy study challenges that thought, by demonstrating the evolution of drug resistance in bacterial lineages never exposed to drugs. This study demonstrates the importance of stewardship in all cases, both transmission of already-resistant strains or selection for newly adapted strains.

Who develops disease and who doesn’t? In a new Journal of Virology report, scientists investigate why some young adults develop infectious mononucleosis when they contract Epstein-Barr virus and why some have an asymptomatic infection. 

Jack Gilbert talks about his studies on microbiomes of all sorts. He describes the origin of the Earth Microbiome Project, which has ambitions to characterize all microbial life on the planet, and talks more specifically about the built microbiome of manmade ecosystems such as hospitals. Gilbert explains how advances in scientific techniques have driven past microbiome-related discoveries and will continue to do so in the future.

“Each year, I ask myself, ‘How am I going to wow folks?’” says Irene Hulede, organizer of the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS). Hulede has worked on ABRCMS from its conception through its annual reorganization, and each year she strives to improve on the last. Learn what inspires Hulede and how her career trajectory change has affected the more than 49,000 ABRCMS attendees over the years.

Tara C. Smith discusses her work uncovering ties between agriculture and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Drug resistance is a huge clinical problem, but our exposure to drug-resistant bacteria can come from everyday interactions - even in our food! Two reports from Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy describe new bacterial isolates carrying plasmid-borne drug resistance determinants. 

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