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Aleea Khan
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202-942-9365
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Joanna Urban
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202-942-9365
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Press Releases

Welcome to ASM's Newsroom, a resource for journalists seeking information relating to the microbiological sciences. Members of the media and the general public can access current and archived press releases highlighting the latest research published in ASM's journals or presented at our meetings.

This week in mBio, an international group of scientists report on laboratory experiments suggesting that a novel LpxC inhibitor can treat multi-drug resistant bacterial infections, including many that originate in hospitals.

Couples who live together share many things: Bedrooms, bathrooms, food, and even bacteria. Microbial ecologists at the University of Waterloo, in Canada, found that people who live together significantly influence the microbial communities on each other's skin.

Researchers have found that the microbes inhabiting a hydraulically fractured shale formation produce toxic, corrosive sulfide through a poorly understood pathway. The team’s findings, published this week in mSphere®, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, reveal that the oil and gas industry may need new ways to monitor and mitigate sulfide-producing bacteria in fractured shales.

Pregnant women with a previous history of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection maintain active antibodies against the virus, and researchers have found that this protection can pass to the nervous systems of their offspring.

Researchers have now discovered a new mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-3, in E. coli of pig origin.

Toxins produced by three different species of fungus growing indoors on wallpaper may become aerosolized, and easily inhaled. The findings, which likely have implications for “sick building syndrome,” were published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Canadian researchers have generated both novel and existing antibiotic resistance mechanisms on experimental farmland, by exposing the soil to specific antibiotics. 

Using high magnification imaging, a team of researchers has identified several never before seen structures on bacteria that represent molecular machinery. 

The pathogen, Vibrio cholerae can colonize the surfaces, as well as the intestines of soft shelled turtles. This finding is strong evidence that soft shelled turtles in China, where they are grown for human consumption, are spreading cholera. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.  

University of Florida researchers may have come a step closer to finding a treatment for a disease called Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, that has been decimating citrus trees in the state.

Research presented at the ASM Microbe 2017 meeting showed a new Zika virus vaccine that gives 100% protection in mice.

Research presented at ASM Microbe 2017 by experts at the Fertility and Cryogenics Lab shows a reliable clinical assay that can detect the Zika virus from semen samples.

Research presented at the ASM Microbe 2017 meeting by Bryan Sanchez of California State University–Northridge in Northridge, Calif., show that antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present in many ready-to-eat foods such as fresh produce and dairy products and may serve as a source of human exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Findings from a study that looked at susceptibility trends of Staphylococcus aureus in U.S. hospital patients showed that key antibiotics used to treat the bacteria became more active over the course of the study, a rare occurrence. 

A new testing and treatment approach led to shorter hospital stays for patients with Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

Bacteria in the vagina can inhibit sexually transmitted Zika virus and herpes simplex virus-2 in women, according to a new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

A Lactobacillus isolate from commercial yogurt, identified as Lactobacillus parafarraginis, inhibited the growth of several multidrug-resistant/extended spectrum β-lactamase bacteria from patients at a hospital in Washington, D.C.. 

Wednesday, 24 May 2017 12:45

ASM's Spending Review

Written by

Over the past several months, the ASM leadership has been conducting a strategic spending review, driven by the necessity to achieve a 2018 breakeven budget, after several years of substantial deficits, which cannot be sustained. As part of this effort, starting in 2018, ASM will be formally discontinuing the ASM small conferences program. We have seen abstract submissions, attendance, and conference proposals trending down significantly across our portfolio, and consequently the program has been operating at a consistent loss.

The American Academy of Microbiology has released a new report on point-of-care (POC) and near-patient testing and changing diagnostic paradigms in microbiology. Technology for diagnosing infectious diseases in patients is rapidly advancing, and new diagnostic tests have the potential to meaningfully improve patient care.

Scientists have discovered a dietary strategy that may address obesity by reducing endotoxemia, a major contributor to chronic, low-grade inflammation (CLGI). The researchers uncovered an interaction between dietary capsaicin (CAP), the major pungent component in red chili, and gut microbiota. This novel mechanism for the anti-obesity effect of CAP acts through prevention of microbial dysbiosis and the subsequent gut barrier dysfunction that can lead to CLGI. The research is published May 23rd in mBio, an open access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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