NEWS ROOM

Welcome to the ASM Newsroom, a resource for journalists seeking information relating to the microbiological sciences.  Members of the media and the general public can access current and archived press releases from the Society as well as tipsheets highlighting the latest research published in our journals or presented at our meetings.

News Media Contacts:

Aleea Khan
Media Manager
communications@asmusa.org

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Oysters Harbor, Transmit Human Norovirus: Avoid Raw Ones

Washington, DC - August 28, 2015 - Oysters not only transmit human norovirus; they also serve as a major reservoir for these pathogens, according to research published August 28 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. “More than 80 percent of human norovirus genotypes...

08-28-2015

Leptospirosis in New York City: A Risk from Rats to Dogs and People

Atlanta, GA – August 26, 2015 -  In New York City, leptospirosis, a bacterial disease that affects humans and animals, is most often spread to both people and dogs from rats, according to a study presented at the 2015 International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases.

08-26-2015

Chronic Chikungunya Symptoms Have Large Public Health Impact

Atlanta, GA – August 26, 2015 -  Prolonged and chronic symptoms of chikungunya fever, persisting up to six months after the acute infection period, were found to have substantial impact on individuals’ daily routines and ability to work, and required additional medical resources to manage, according to research presented at...

08-26-2015

Hepatitis A-Like Virus Identified in Seals

Washington, DC – August 25, 2015 - Scientists in the Center for Infection and Immunity at the Mailman School of Public Health have discovered a new virus in seals that is the closest known relative of the human hepatitis A virus. The finding provides new clues on the emergence of...

08-25-2015

Personal Clothing May Spread Respiratory Infections within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Atlanta, GA – August 24, 2015 - Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which is the leading cause of childhood respiratory hospitalizations among premature babies, can be detected from the clothes worn by caregivers/visitors who are visiting infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to research being presented at the International...

08-24-2015

Influenza Vaccines Provide Moderate Protection throughout the Entire Flu Season

Atlanta, GA – August 24, 2015 - Individuals who received the flu vaccine were protected for up to 6 months post-vaccination, the duration of most flu seasons, according to a study presented at the 2015 International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases.

08-24-2015

Is MERS another SARS: The Facts Behind Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

Atlanta, GA – August 24, 2015 - Experts show that while Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV), a viral respiratory illness, is infecting less people, it has a higher mortality rate and affects a specific target population when compared to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV).  This research is being presented at the...

08-24-2015

Long Distance Travelers Likely Contributing to Antibiotic Resistance's Spread

Washington, DC – August 20, 2015 - Swedish exchange students who studied in India and in central Africa returned from their sojourns with an increased diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in their gut microbiomes. The research is published 10 August in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American...

08-20-2015

Following Maternal Transmission, Group B Strep Mutates to Sicken Infants

Washington, DC - August 18, 2015 - Group B streptococcus, a mostly benign inhabitant of healthy adults, is one of the world’s leading causes of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. A team of French investigators has now shown that such cases might occur when the microbe mutates within the infant following...

08-18-2015

Unlikely Element Turns up in Enzyme; Commercial Renewable Fuels Might Ultimately Result

Washington, DC – August 14, 2015 - Tungsten is exceptionally rare in biological systems. Thus, it came as a huge surprise to Michael Adams, PhD., and his collaborators when they discovered it in what appeared to be a novel enzyme in the hot spring-inhabiting bacterium, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. The researchers hypothesized...

08-14-2015

 

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