Newsroom Search

News Media Contacts

Aleea Khan
Senior Manager, Science Communication Strategy
202-942-9365
communications@asmusa.org

Joanna Urban
Public Relations Coordinator
202-942-9365
communications@asmusa.org


SIGN UP
Subscribe to our listserv & receive press releases and other updates by email

Saturday, 03 June 2017 11:08

Lactobacillus from Yogurt Inhibits Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Pathogens

Written by 
Published in Press Releases

New Orleans, LA – June 2, 2017 – A Lactobacillus isolate from commercial yogurt, identified as Lactobacillus parafarraginis, inhibited the growth of several multidrug-resistant/extended spectrum β-lactamase bacteria from patients at a hospital in Washington, D.C.. The research was presented at ASM Microbe 2017 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

The inhibitory substance is a unique, bacteriocin-like peptide that is heat stable up to 121°C. Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria and released to kill other related bacteria that are not immune to their action.

“Considering the current upsurge of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, especially among the gram-negative bacteria, and the exigent need to find viable alternatives, findings from the study may hold promise for possible therapeutic application,” said Rachelle Allen-McFarlane, doctoral candidate in the Biology Department at Howard University, Washington, D.C.

Lactobacillus parafarraginis KU495926, identified by 16S rRNA, was isolated from a sample of commercial yogurt on de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe agar by standard plate count technique under anaerobic conditions. The isolate exhibited the typical lactic acid bacterial characteristics: gram positive, catalase, oxidase, and motility negative. Screening of the antimicrobial activity by spot and well-diffusion assays showed that the isolate inhibited the growth of several multidrug-resistant/extended-spectrum β-lactamase gram-negative bacterial pathogens from a local hospital.

Analyses of the extract by fast-perfusion liquid chromatography (FPLC), SDS-PAGE, and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) suggested that the inhibitory agent is a bacteriocin.

The research was conducted in the laboratory of Dr. Broderick Eribo, in the Biology Department at Howard University, Washington, DC. Drs. Winston Anderson, Adrian Douglas Allen, Ayele Gugssa, Ms. Garima Bansal and June Prout, all affiliates of Howard University, also contributed to this work.

###

The American Society for Microbiology is the largest single life science society, composed of over 50,000 scientists and health professionals. ASM's mission is to promote and advance the microbial sciences.

ASM advances the microbial sciences through conferences, publications, certifications and educational opportunities. It enhances laboratory capacity around the globe through training and resources. It provides a network for scientists in academia, industry and clinical settings. Additionally, ASM promotes a deeper understanding of the microbial sciences to diverse audiences.

Last modified on Saturday, 03 June 2017 11:33

TPL_asm2013_ADDITIONAL_INFORMATION

TPL_asm2013_SEARCH

6495:lactobacillus-from-yogurt-inhibits-multidrug-resistant-bacterial-pathogens