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Bacteria that prey on other bacteria could help keep corals healthy!

Published in Bacteriofiles

Support your commensal and symbiotic gut bacteria while celebrating with family and friends this holiday season.

Published in Microbial Sciences

Jack Gilbert talks about his studies on microbiomes of all sorts. He describes the origin of the Earth Microbiome Project, which has ambitions to characterize all microbial life on the planet, and talks more specifically about the built microbiome of manmade ecosystems such as hospitals. Gilbert explains how advances in scientific techniques have driven past microbiome-related discoveries and will continue to do so in the future.

Bacteria affect fruit fly behavior by reducing their need and craving for protein-rich food!

Published in Bacteriofiles

Researchers in the United Kingdom have discovered that the mix of microorganisms that inhabit a person’s saliva are largely determined by the human host’s household. The study, published this week in mBio®, shows that early environmental influences play a far larger role than human genetics in shaping the salivary microbiome—the group of organisms that play a crucial role in oral and overall health.

Published in Press Releases

Filament-forming organisms help bacteria swim through soil and exchange genes with each other! Also, new feature: microbe of the episode!

Published in Bacteriofiles
Thursday, 10 August 2017 16:46

The bottom line - TWiM 158

A report on prokaryotic viral DNA in mammalian brain, and how diarrhea is beneficial, by clearing enteric pathogens.

Published in TWiM

Couples who live together share many things: Bedrooms, bathrooms, food, and even bacteria. Microbial ecologists at the University of Waterloo, in Canada, found that people who live together significantly influence the microbial communities on each other's skin.

Published in Press Releases

The intricate microenvironment of human breast tissue supports regionally distinct microbiota, which may provide new insight to cancer risk and therapy. As a follow up to the 2016 article by Julie Wolf, the role of microbes in breast cancer is revisited, with an emphasis on the role of probiotics in breast cancer prevention.

Published in Microbial Sciences

Gut microbes can even affect formation/remodeling of bones.

Published in Bacteriofiles
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