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The evidence that the gut microbiome influences Parkinson’s Disease, implications of this research for the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and the involvement of the microbiome in other neurological conditions.

Published in microTalk

Unlike most animals, caterpillars don't seem to have a resident gut microbe to help them in various ways!

Published in Bacteriofiles

Gut microbes in mice break down plant foods and produce molecules that stimulate the immune system to resist influenza!

Published in Bacteriofiles
Thursday, 04 January 2018 18:12

The lesser of two weevils - TWiM 168

The nasal microbiota of dairy farmers, and attenuation of bacterial virulence by quorum sensing in the maize weevil.

Published in TWiM

How do fungi interact with our gut microbiome? Advances in detection and characterization techniques are now allowing researchers to uncover the importance of the fungal members of the intestinal community

Published in Microbial Sciences

Bacteria that prey on other bacteria could help keep corals healthy!

Published in Bacteriofiles

Support your commensal and symbiotic gut bacteria while celebrating with family and friends this holiday season.

Published in Microbial Sciences

Jack Gilbert talks about his studies on microbiomes of all sorts. He describes the origin of the Earth Microbiome Project, which has ambitions to characterize all microbial life on the planet, and talks more specifically about the built microbiome of manmade ecosystems such as hospitals. Gilbert explains how advances in scientific techniques have driven past microbiome-related discoveries and will continue to do so in the future.

Bacteria affect fruit fly behavior by reducing their need and craving for protein-rich food!

Published in Bacteriofiles

Researchers in the United Kingdom have discovered that the mix of microorganisms that inhabit a person’s saliva are largely determined by the human host’s household. The study, published this week in mBio®, shows that early environmental influences play a far larger role than human genetics in shaping the salivary microbiome—the group of organisms that play a crucial role in oral and overall health.

Published in Press Releases
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