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202-942-9365
communications@asmusa.org

Joanna Urban
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202-942-9365
communications@asmusa.org


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The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the finding that mutations identified in the 2015 West African epidemic do not alter pathogenesis in animals. 

Published in TWiV

Recent mumps virus outbreaks in the US are due to waning vaccine efficacy, and an intranasally delivered small interfering RNA that controls West Nile infection in the brain.

Published in TWiV
Thursday, 08 February 2018 00:07

Rats, lice, and nanoparticles - TWiM 170

The spread of plague was likely due to human ectoparasites, not rats, and discussion of a durable, broadly protective protein nanoparticle influenza virus vaccine.

Published in TWiM
Sunday, 10 December 2017 16:15

Songs of innocence and experience - TWiV 471

Restriction of dengue virus vaccine by Sanofi, and data which suggest that Dengvaxia causes enhanced disease in previously uninfected recipients

Published in TWiV

Stacey Schultz-Cherry explains the selection process to choose the influenza virus strains to include in the annual influenza vaccine.

Monday, 28 August 2017 15:55

Siderophores: A treatment target?

Siderophores are essential for bacterial pathogenesis—does that make them a weakness for researchers to exploit?

Published in Microbial Sciences

At the University of Maryland, Baltimore, researchers are using a practical method, bacterial enzymatic combinatorial chemistry (BECC), to generate functionally diverse molecules that can potentially be used as adjuvants.

Published in mBiosphere

A study published this week in mBio demonstrates that a novel technique can be used to build better vaccines for infectious diseases. The study shows that a practical method, bacterial enzymatic combinatorial chemistry (BECC), can be used to generate functionally diverse molecules that can potentially be used as adjuvants

Published in Press Releases

Bypassing the slow growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with computer models provides new ways to learn about the disease.

Published in Microbial Sciences

Improving the whooping cough vaccine to restore it to pre-reformulation levels of protection, without reducing its safety.

Published in microTalk
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