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202-942-9365
communications@asmusa.org

Joanna Urban
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202-942-9365
communications@asmusa.org


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ASM Communications

ASM Communications

Couples who live together share many things: Bedrooms, bathrooms, food, and even bacteria. Microbial ecologists at the University of Waterloo, in Canada, found that people who live together significantly influence the microbial communities on each other's skin.

Summertime brings people closer to the great outdoors - and to arthropods that can spread disease! In this week's Bugs & Drugs, we emphasize the importance of a full patient history and provide resources on infections of leisure.

Several of the American Society for Clinical Pathology's "40 Under Forty"  include young, successful ASM members, and we here at Bugs & Drugs reached out to ask them about their research and careers. 

Researchers have found that the microbes inhabiting a hydraulically fractured shale formation produce toxic, corrosive sulfide through a poorly understood pathway. The team’s findings, published this week in mSphere®, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, reveal that the oil and gas industry may need new ways to monitor and mitigate sulfide-producing bacteria in fractured shales.

Pregnant women with a previous history of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection maintain active antibodies against the virus, and researchers have found that this protection can pass to the nervous systems of their offspring.

Researchers have now discovered a new mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-3, in E. coli of pig origin.

Toxins produced by three different species of fungus growing indoors on wallpaper may become aerosolized, and easily inhaled. The findings, which likely have implications for “sick building syndrome,” were published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Point-of-care diagnostic testing is quickly advancing, in part due to advances in molecular testing. Our latest Bugs & Drugs post provides resources for keeping up-to-date with the latest molecular tests, including infection characteristics such as antibiotic resistance.

Canadian researchers have generated both novel and existing antibiotic resistance mechanisms on experimental farmland, by exposing the soil to specific antibiotics. 

Using high magnification imaging, a team of researchers has identified several never before seen structures on bacteria that represent molecular machinery. 

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