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Press Releases

Welcome to ASM's Newsroom, a resource for journalists seeking information relating to the microbiological sciences. Members of the media and the general public can access current and archived press releases highlighting the latest research published in ASM's journals or presented at our meetings.

Washington, D.C.—November 17, 2015—Researchers working for the U.S. Geological Survey have identified the fungal culprit behind an often deadly skin infection in snakes in the eastern U.S. Published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, the research shows that Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola is the definitive cause of snake fungal disease (SFD), which will help researchers pinpoint why it is emerging as a threat to snake populations and how its impacts can be mitigated.

Friday, 13 November 2015 10:48

Irradiated Anthrax Can Be Sequenced – Fast!

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Washington, DC – November 13, 2015 - These days, mail addressed to selected government offices gets irradiated, in order to kill any biological agents, notably anthrax spores. The downside of this is that viable spores have been needed to identify the anthrax strain, which can be critical to treating those infected. But now Henry S. Gibbons, PhD, has shown that full sequences can quickly be determined from irradiated spores. The research is published November 13 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC – November 10, 2015 – A single course of antibiotics has enough strength to disrupt the normal makeup of microorganisms in the gut for as long as a year, potentially leading to antibiotic resistance, European researchers reported this week in mBio®, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC – October 30, 2015 –  Biofilms—mats of bacteria similar to the plaque that grows on teeth—frequently coat the surfaces of catheters, and of various medical implants and prostheses, where they can threaten lives or lead to failure of the implants. Antibiotics are impotent against biofilms. Now Jakub Kwiecinski, PhD, Tao Jin, MD, PhD, and collaborators show that coating implants with “tissue plasminogen activator” can prevent Staphylococcus aureus, the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections, from forming biofilms. The research is published 30 October in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC - October 28, 2015 - An article published in Science on October 28th steered by key ASM members highlights the need for an interdisciplinary initiative that would focus on better understanding microbial interactions that could allow for progress in the fields of agriculture, health and energy, to name a few. Led by corresponding author Jeffery F. Miller, Ph.D., Past President, ASM, the article proposes the launch of a Unified Microbiome Initiative (UMI).

Washington, D.C.—October 27, 2015—Australian researchers have found a way to boost the effectiveness and cross-protective capabilities of an influenza A vaccine by adding a simple component. Published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, the research in mice could lead to better seasonal flu vaccines for humans, and also vaccines that could provide community protection in the early stages of an outbreak of a novel flu virus strain.

Washington, DC – October 27, 2015 – Ocean Station Aloha, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM) has been designated a Milestones in Microbiology site by the American Society for Microbiology. 

Washington, DC – October 23, 2015 - A phage showed strong anti-microbial activity against a type of food-borne bacterium that often kills infants after infecting them via infant formula. Phages are viruses that infect only bacteria. The research is published October 23 online in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC - October 13, 2015 - To date, studies in pregnant women examining transport of drugs across the placenta are rare and inadequate, said Tomo Nabekura, PhD. Such knowledge could be vital to preserving fetal health. In a new laboratory study, Nabekura and colleagues have illuminated a piece of this puzzle, and the results hint that mothers taking new anti-hepatitis C and/or anti-HIV drugs along with anti-hypertensives or non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) could be raising the risk of birth defects or stunting fetal growth, respectively. The research was published ahead of print in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC – October 13, 2015 – The Department of Microbiology and Immunology of the University of Michigan Medical School has been named a Milestones in Microbiology site by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). 

Tuesday, 13 October 2015 09:52

Listeria Can Grow on Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples

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Washington, DC – October 13, 2015 – Caramel apples punctured with dipping sticks and left unrefrigerated over the course of a couple of weeks may harbor a bacterium called Listeria monocytogenes, according to a study published this week in mBio®, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC –October 8, 2015 – The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has been named a Milestones in Microbiology site by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM).  A dedication ceremony is scheduled for Friday, October 16, 2015, at 3 pm at the Charles Miller Auditorium, B102 Chemical and Life Sciences Laboratory, 601 South Goodwin Avenue in Urbana, Illinois.

Washington, DC —October 6, 2015— HIV particles are effectively trapped by the cervicovaginal mucus from women who harbor a particular vaginal bacteria species, Lactobacillus crispatus. The findings, published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, could lead to new ways to reduce or block vaginal transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Washington, DC - October 2, 2015 - Tick species not normally present in the United States are arriving here on migratory birds. Some of these ticks carry disease-causing Ricksettia species, and some of those species are exotic to the US. The research is published on October 2nd in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, D.C., September 29, 2015 – The American Society for Microbiology recently announced the winners of the 2015 Agar Art Contest, which included designs of neurons, a map of New York City and the harvest season.

Friday, 25 September 2015 11:54

New Diversity for Lager Beers

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Washington, DC – September 25, 2015 - Unlike ales, lager beers differ little in flavor. But now, by creating new crosses among the relevant yeasts, Kevin Verstrepen, PhD, Stijn Mertens, and their collaborators have opened up new horizons of taste. The research is published in the September 25 Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Wednesday, 23 September 2015 09:42

New Virus Identified in Blood Supply

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Washington, DC – September 22, 2015 - Scientists have discovered a new virus that can be transmitted through the blood supply. Currently, it is unclear whether the virus is harmful or not, but it is related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human pegivirus (HPgV), the latter of which was formerly known as hepatitis G virus. The new virus, which researchers have named human hepegivirus-1 (HHpgV-1), is described in the September 22 issue of mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC - September 22, 2015 - Cells associated with inflammation and blood clotting accumulate in the brain blood vessels of children affected by a potentially fatal form of malaria called cerebral malaria (CM), potentially contributing to the disease process, an international team of researchers has found, and HIV can exacerbate this development. The work was published this week in mBio®, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

San Diego, California - September 20, 2015 – Study reports that an outbreak of Bordetella parapertussis occurred in 2014 in Southeastern Minnesota, in the months of October through December.  This research is presented at ASM’s 55th Interscience Conference of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC/ICC).

San Diego, California - September 20, 2015 – Results from a double-blind phase 2 clinical study show that finafloxacin was a more effective and safe option than ciprofloxacin for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and acute pyelonephritis. This research is being presented at ASM’s 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC/ICC).

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