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Press Releases

Welcome to ASM's Newsroom, a resource for journalists seeking information relating to the microbiological sciences. Members of the media and the general public can access current and archived press releases highlighting the latest research published in ASM's journals or presented at our meetings.

Washington, D.C. – June 30, 2015 – Hantaviruses use cholesterol in cell walls to gain access into cells and infect humans, according to laboratory research published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, D.C. —June 30, 2015—Human urine contains factors that prevent a common culprit in urinary tract infections (UTIs), uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria, from properly attaching to bladder cells, a necessary step for infection. The research, published this week in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, reveals a weakness that could be exploited to develop more effective, non-antibiotic treatments for UTIs.

Washington, D.C. - June 24, 2015 - Urinary tract and sexually transmitted infections in women are misdiagnosed by emergency departments nearly half the time, according to a paper in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. These misdiagnoses result in overuse of antibiotics, and increased antibiotic resistance, according to Michelle Hecker, MD, an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, and her collaborators.

Washington, DC - June 23, 2015 - Generic medications used frequently in the management of heart disease patients also have the potential to bolster the immune systems of patients with Ebola virus and some other life-threatening illnesses, researchers report this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, D.C. - June 23, 2015 - Researchers have identified a new class of antifungals to treat the more than 300 million people worldwide who develop serious fungal infections. The research is described in the current issue of mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC - June 19, 2015 - While most cases of Lyme disease in the U.S. are caught early and resolve successfully with antibiotic treatment, substantial numbers of cases that are initially missed become chronic, with patients suffering from Lyme arthritis. Now, Kim Lewis, PhD, and collaborators have shown the likely cause of this phenomenon. The bacterium that causes Lyme disease form dormant, or non-growing bacterial cells known as persisters, that are highly resistant to all antibiotics. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Friday, 05 June 2015 13:47

Copper Destroys Human Norovirus—Fast!

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Washington, D.C. – June 5, 2015 - Metal alloys containing copper can destroy* human norovirus, according to a paper published online ahead of print on May 15, in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Houston - June 2, 2015 - Rice University-based publisher OpenStax College and the American Society for Microbiology Press today announced they are teaming up to produce Microbiology, a new introductory-level textbook due for release in spring 2016 that will be free online and low-cost in print.

New Orleans, Louisiana - June 3, 2015 - The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) today announced plans to launch mSystems™, a new open access journal, in early 2016.   mSystems™ will publish preeminent work that stems from applying technologies for high-throughput analyses to achieve insights into the metabolic and regulatory systems at the scale of  both the single cell and microbial communities. The scope of mSystems™ encompasses all important biological and biochemical findings drawn from analyses of large datasets, as well as new computational approaches for deriving these insights.  mSystems™ will welcome submissions from researchers who apply “omics” technologies to microbial systems—including the microbiome, genomics, metagenomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, glycomics, bioinformatics and computational microbiology.

New Orleans, Louisiana - June 3, 2015 - The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) today announced plans to launch mSphere™, a new pan-microbiology open-access journal in early 2016.   mSphere™ will create new opportunities for researchers in microbial sciences to share findings that are transforming our understanding of human health and disease, ecosystems, neuroscience, agriculture,  energy production, climate change, evolution, biogeochemical cycling, and food and drug production.

Tuesday, 02 June 2015 10:43

Toothbrush Contamination in Communal Bathrooms

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New Orleans, Louisiana - June 2, 2015 - Data confirms that there is transmission of fecal coliforms in communal bathrooms at Quinnipiac University and that toothbrushes can serve as a vector for transmission of potentially pathogenic organisms. This research is presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

Washington, DC - June 2, 2015 - The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) welcomes the opportunity to discuss ways the public and private sectors can collaborate to address the worldwide crisis of antimicrobial resistance at the White House Forum on Antibiotic Stewardship which is being held in Washington DC today. This high level meeting of experts is a significant opportunity to move forward with comprehensive policies to improve antibiotic stewardship and slow the emergence of resistant bacteria.

London - June 1st, 2015 - Publons, the world’s largest peer review platform, and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the oldest and largest life science membership organization, have entered into a pilot partnership, which  will allow verified peer review recognition to peer reviewers of 12 participating ASM journals via the Publons platform. As of 1 June 2015, ASM and Publons are working together as part of a pilot program to improve the peer review process of journals published by ASM.The content of this page is restricted to ASM Members only.The content of this page is restricted to ASM Members only.

New Orleans, Louisiana - June 1, 2015 - The skin microbiome is considered our first line of defense against pathogens. Across our bodies, we are covered with a diverse assemblage of bacteria. However, the skin can be a harsh environment for beneficial bacteria to live on due to UV exposure, high salinity, and desiccation stress. Research being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology found that these suboptimal conditions may cause some bacteria to enter a dormant state, while other bacteria may simply die.

New Orleans, Louisiana - June 1, 2015 - Prevalence of a recently discovered serotype of oral bacterium, with a possible link to a number of systemic diseases, was found for the first time in a small cohort of African-American schoolchildren in a southwest Alabama town, according to research being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

New Orleans, Louisiana - June 1, 2015 - Much like the microbes in our gut, the plant microbiome also elicits a low-level immune response in the host plant, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. Researchers found that when microbe-free plants were exposed to the pathogen responsible for speck disease in tomato, Pseudomonas syringae, disease was significantly less in plants with a microbiome.

Monday, 01 June 2015 09:46

Good Craft Beer Can Be Spoiled by Bacteria

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New Orleans, Louisiana - June 1, 2015 - Beer spoilage bacteria was found in 10 of 50 final product beer samples from four of the nine breweries tested in Houston, Texas, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. 

New Orleans, Louisiana – May 31, 2015 - Preliminary results from a survey of 192 Oakland University undergraduate female students in Auburn Hills, Michigan, revealed that although a vast majority of them are aware of the human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV), about 54% are not vaccinated.  This research is being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

New Orleans, Louisiana - May 31, 2015 - The antibacterial effectiveness of Agion silver zeolite technology was tested on door handles across the Penn State Erie campus and after four years of sampling, a significant difference was observed between the bacterial populations isolated from silver versus control-coated door handles. This research is presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

New Orleans, Louisiana - May 31, 2015 - Preliminary results from a survey of 192 Oakland University undergraduate female students in Auburn Hills, Michigan, revealed that although a vast majority of them are aware of the human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV), about 54% are not vaccinated.  This research is being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

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