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Meet the Microbiologist

Meet the Microbiologist is a podcast that showcases the people behind the scientific discoveries. Each guest introduces their research in one of the cutting-edge areas of the microbial sciences: genomics, antibiotic resistance, synthetic biology, emerging infectious diseases, microbial ecology, public health, probiotics, and more! You no longer have to suffer in silence: learn about epidemiology as you run errands, explore drug discovery as you drive home, delve into microbial genomics at the gym. Each guest discusses their scientific discoveries and where future technologies may lead. Meet the Microbiologist, hosted by Julie Wolf, was previously titled Meet the Scientist, hosted by Merry Buckley and Carl Zimmer.

Today, we get most of the fuel for our cars out of the ground. It's a process fraught with dangerous consequences, from the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico to the rise in global temperatures thanks to greenhouse gases. Dr. Liao is among a growing number of scientists who think that microbes can help us out of this predicament.

 

Friday, 21 May 2010 11:59

The Making of Meet the Scientist - MTS 50.5

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To mark the celebration of Microbeworld's 50th episode of the Meet the Scientist podcast, we created a time lapse video that shows exactly what it takes to produce a single episode of the show.

Wednesday, 19 May 2010 12:05

R. Ford Denison: Darwin on the Farm - MTS 50

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R. Ford Denison is an evolutionary biologist who's interested in how to make agriculture better. The ways in which plants thrive or fail are shaped by their evolutionary history, as well as the evolution that unfolds every planting season.

Irwin Sherman, professor emeritus at the University of California at Riverside, talks about the century-long quest for a vaccine against malaria.

Keith Klugman studies the disease that is the number one killer of children worldwide. If you guessed malaria or AIDS, you’d be wrong. It’s pneumonia. Two million children under five die every year from it every year--one child every 15 seconds.

Wednesday, 07 April 2010 17:46

Peter Daszak: Stalking the Wild Microbe - MTS 47

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Dr. Peter Daszak talks about the threat new pathogens pose to endangered species and go into detail about his discovery that chytridiomycosis, a fungal disease caused by the chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, is responsible for global amphibian population declines.

Curtis Suttle has helped show that viruses are by far the most common life forms on the planet. They also contain most of the genetic diversity of life, and they even control how much oxygen we have to breathe. I talked to Suttle about coming to terms with the fact that we live on a virus planet, and how hard it is to find a place on Earth that's virus-free--even two miles underground.

James Collins helped launch a new kind of science called synthetic biology. I talked to Collins about the achievements of synthetic biology over the past decade, such as engineering E. coli that can count, and about the future of synthetic biology--from using bacteria to make fuel to reprogramming the bacteria in our guts to improve our health.

In this episode, I talk to Michael Worobey, an associate professor at the University of Arizona.

Worobey is virus detective, gathering clues about how some of the world's deadliest pathogens have emerged and spread across the globe. Worobey and I talked about the harrowing journeys he has made in search of the origin of HIV, as well as the round-the-clock data-processing he and his colleagues used to discover the hidden history of the new H1N1 flu strain.

Download: mp3 (42.5 min | 19.5 megs)
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Photos taken in January 2000 in the forest about 60km south of Kisangani DRC during an expedition to collect samples from wild chimpanzee.

Wednesday, 03 February 2010 11:05

MTS43 - Rob Knight - The Microbes That Inhabit Us

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In this episode, I speak to Rob Knight, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Knight studies our inner ecology: the 100 trillion microbes that grow in and on our bodies. Knight explained how hundreds of species can coexist on the palm of your hand, how bacteria manipulate your immune system and maybe even your brain, and how obesity and other health problems may come down to the wrong balance of microbes.

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